Queensland’s partial repayment of ancient debts to Aboriginal workers this week was tangible justice.
JULY 13, 2019
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Queensland’s partial repayment of ancient debts to Aboriginal workers this week was tangible justice. In this era of political speech without substance it felt especially momentous.

This week, Crikey delved into that settlement and what it means for the other states in this settler nation. Elsewhere, INQ released its report on the Australian mining boom you’ve never heard of. Hint: it’s in Africa.

As always, we’re keen to hear what you made of the week’s news. Write to [email protected].

Have a great weekend,

Bhakthi Puvanenthiran
Managing Editor

 
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Out of Africa

The new frontier

GEORGIA WILKINS and CHARLIE LEWIS 10 minute read

Mining in Africa's developing nations can be fraught, with both small cap companies and governments looking to make sizable profits. But who are the winners and losers in this mad dash for cash?

Dirty money and blurred lines

GEORGIA WILKINS and CHARLIE LEWIS 6 minute read

It’s the new frontier for Australian mining but our fraught expansion into Africa now goes back decades, and early missteps in the continent are proving hard to shake off.

Can Australian companies escape doing deals with dictators?

GEORGIA WILKINS and CHARLIE LEWIS 8 minute read

Few places are considered off limits for Australian mining companies operating in Africa, including Eritrea, one of the most repressed and politically unstable places in the world.

 
What’s next for Indigenous reparations?

CHARLIE LEWIS 4 minute read

Queensland may have agreed to pay Indigenous workers whose wages were stolen by the state, but the national issue of reparations is far from over.

The right is destined to lose the fight on Folau

GUY RUNDLE 4 minute read

In the wake of Israel Folau's sacking, sections of the conservative right are pushing for greater religious freedoms. But in doing so they risk blowing up the rights they already have.

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Why power likes to play the victim

RUBY HAMAD 4 minute read

Speaking truth to power is difficult enough. But as human rights lawyer Diana Sayed discovered on Q&A this week, when power plays the victim card it becomes practically impossible.

Tax cuts coverage ignored substance, focused on trivia

BERNARD KEANE 3 minute read

When it came to covering the most important change in our income tax system for decades, the media focused on political trivia at the expense of hard analysis.

Who is Amanda Stoker, rising star of the religious right?

JENNINE KHALIK 4 minute read

Stoker is fast making a name for herself in the Senate. But where did this outspoken Christian come from? And what beliefs inform her policymaking?

Suicide cannot be made a front in the culture war
Heard the latest conspiracy theory from the right? Apparently there’s a vast cabal, starting with Prime Minister Scott Morrison, engaged in “whitewashing” the real cause of suicide — an unfair family court system. Our current anti-suicide efforts are just another front in a wide-ranging war on men by feminists in powerful institutions. — Bernard Keane

A poorly researched article by Bettina Arndt shows how the right is turning male suicide into yet another aspect of Australia’s culture wars.

How Afterpay became one of the most valuable companies in Australia

ADAM SCHWAB 5 minute read

The buy now, pay later system has a market value of nearly $7 billion. But will what investors buy now definitely pay off later?

The supreme hypocrisy and failure of a ‘zero suicide goal’

GUY RUNDLE 5 minute read

A 'towards zero' suicide prevention strategy is an admission of philosophical failure — especially in a country like Australia.

What’s missing from the naive phone ban debate

CAI HOLROYD 4 minute read

Has anyone writing these policies ever actually met a teenager? A phone ban isn't just impractical, it's reckless.

Yes, Labor made the right choice on the government’s tax cuts

GUY RUNDLE 4 minute read

When it came to a tax bill that was destined to pass no matter what, Labor cut its losses. That people are seeing it as a new sellout or betrayal is utterly bewildering.

How could Australia develop nukes?

AMBER SCHULTZ 4 minute read

Author Hugh White and Chernobyl-mania have put nuclear weapons are back in the spotlight. Could nukes really be in our future?

The government’s war on the press has been years in the making
There is no reason for the media to be comforted by the special “protections” it was given in 2015. They provide only a fig leaf, and an invisible one at that. — Michael Bradley

Since passing metadata retention laws in 2015, the government has been hard at work gunning for journalists. The AFP’s demand for Qantas to hand over personal travel records should not be surprising.

Why do politicians spill their guts for books like Plots and Prayers?

CHRISTOPHER WARREN 3 minute read

Politicians risk looking like complete fools when they reveal all for a book like Niki Savva's Plots and Prayers or for ABC documentaries like The Killing Season. Still, they persevere.

RSL Victoria’s masterclass on how not to run an AGM

STEPHEN MAYNE 4 minute read

For an organisation that represents soldiers who risked their lives to defend Australian freedom and democracy, the RSL should think about practicing some freedom and democracy of its own.

 
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