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Topic: wildlife
Data appears to show populations of Tasmanian devils have stabilised. Biologist <b>Allen Greer</b> asks why you're not hearing that from the state government or advocates of "saving" the devil.

Is this threatened species in decline? The devil’s in the detail

Data appears to show populations of Tasmanian devils have stabilised. Biologist Allen Greer asks why you're not hearing that from the state government or advocates of "saving" the devil.

Everyone knows the Tasmanian tiger is extinct, right? Well, thylacine researcher <b>Col Bailey</b> says everyone is wrong.

The truth will be revealed: I have seen the Tassie tiger

Everyone knows the Tasmanian tiger is extinct, right? Well, thylacine researcher Col Bailey says everyone is wrong.

Gerard Geer makes sculptures and jewellery out of roadkill, contravening the <em>Wildlife Act</em>. He promises to burn his art, but not before one final exhibition. <em>Crikey</em> intern <b>Bension Siebert</b> reports.

Legally speaking, taxidermy roadkill artist could be stuffed

Gerard Geer makes sculptures and jewellery out of roadkill, contravening the Wildlife Act. He promises to burn his art, but not before one final exhibition. Crikey intern Bension Siebert reports.

Wandering cats are a menace to native birds and wildlife, but the cat "right to life" lobby is preventing them being euthanased. <b>Gareth Morgan</b> and <b>Geoff Simmons</b> of NZ's Morgan Foundation want a cat crackdown.

The trans-Tasman cat fight: why Fluffy has to go

Wandering cats are a menace to native birds and wildlife, but the cat "right to life" lobby is preventing them being euthanased. Gareth Morgan and Geoff Simmons of NZ's Morgan Foundation want a cat crackdown.

Imagine playing a cricket match with wildcats prowling the edges of the field and 600kg antelopes trying to nuzzle up to you. <b>Rafiq Copeland</b> indulges in some colonial cricket in the Masaai Mara Reserve, Kenya.

A touch of cricket in the Maasai Mara

Imagine playing a cricket match with wildcats prowling the edges of the field and 600kg antelopes trying to nuzzle up to you. Rafiq Copeland indulges in some colonial cricket in the Masaai Mara Reserve, Kenya.

It's not the saltwater crocs or the deadly brown snakes that are the most troublesome wildlife in flooded Queensland. It's the sandflies, tiny insects that leave itchy bites that last for weeks. And the supermarket is sold out of insect repellent, says <b>Anton Lang</b> from Rockhampton.

Rockhampton flood crisis: attack of the blood suckers

It's not the saltwater crocs or the deadly brown snakes that are the most troublesome wildlife in flooded Queensland. It's the sandflies, tiny insects that leave itchy bites that last for weeks. And the supermarket is sold out of insect repellent, says Anton Lang from Rockhampton.

The BBC make a lot of lovely programs about wildlife and the natural world in Africa, but not one of them mentions climate change -- odd no?

Monbiot: BBC films omit climate change

The BBC make a lot of lovely programs about wildlife and the natural world in Africa, but not one of them mentions climate change -- odd no?

The mystery of crop circles in and around Tasmania's legal opium poppy fields may have been solved. It's not aliens, but junkie wallabies hopping around in dazed circles.

Stoned wallabies, not aliens, damaging poppy crops

The mystery of crop circles in and around Tasmania's legal opium poppy fields may have been solved. It's not aliens, but junkie wallabies hopping around in dazed circles.

Deep in the Amazon rain forest hides a very special frog called the Phyllomedusa bicolor. The Mayoruna tribe uses this frog’s gooey secretions to obtain superpowers that transform them into killer hunting machines. This helps them target their prey -- monkeys. Yes, they eat monkeys.

Amazon frog’s secretions turn humans into killing machines

Deep in the Amazon rain forest hides a very special frog called the Phyllomedusa bicolor. The Mayoruna tribe uses this frog’s gooey secretions to obtain superpowers that transform them into killer hunting machines. This helps them target their prey -- monkeys. Yes, they eat monkeys.

One unhappy reporter catches a fly in his mouth and blames it on the countryside. While another falls foul of some bird.

Not happy Jan — reporters v wildlife

One unhappy reporter catches a fly in his mouth and blames it on the countryside. While another falls foul of some bird.

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