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Topic: war in Afghanistan

International revelations

This week: dictatorship — a how-to guide, dubbing sucks, and do we really have a fuel security problem?

Proposed Afghanistan ceasefire is a further sign of Kabul’s weakness

There's no end in sight for the War in Afghanistan, though a proposed ceasefire suggests that cracks in the government are continuing to deepen.

Afghanistan is no closer to peace, despite what the US claims

16 years on and despite peace talks, the corrupt Kabul government is still on the back-foot in its war with the Taliban.

The United States is guilty of war crimes, human rights violations and extreme violence. As its ally, Australia' silence on morally reprehensible behaviour constitutes complicity, writes <b>Dr Scott Burchill</b>, senior lecturer in international relations at Deakin University.

Australia’s moral duty to slap down US aggression

The United States is guilty of war crimes, human rights violations and extreme violence. As its ally, Australia' silence on morally reprehensible behaviour constitutes complicity, writes Dr Scott Burchill, senior lecturer in international relations at Deakin University.

There might not be a way for the US to "win" the war in Afghanistan. It also might not be able to achieve a Vietnam-style "peace with honour" defeat.

No peace with honour in Afghanistan

There might not be a way for the US to "win" the war in Afghanistan. It also might not be able to achieve a Vietnam-style "peace with honour" defeat.

Turkey, Greece, Syria, Brazil, Afghanistan, Obama, Cameron, Assange ... something is shifting, as borders of even first-tier nations become porous and action once off the table now is very much on.

Through porous borders, a new world order flows

Turkey, Greece, Syria, Brazil, Afghanistan, Obama, Cameron, Assange ... something is shifting, as borders of even first-tier nations become porous and action once off the table now is very much on.

The family of two Afghan boys killed in a mission involving Australian troops is likely to receive less than $2000 -- appropriate compensation for the country.

Cost of life in Afghanistan: a few hundred dollars the norm

The family of two Afghan boys killed in a mission involving Australian troops is likely to receive less than $2000 -- appropriate compensation for the country.

Australia’s mission in Afghanistan is a failure, as Fairfax's Hugh White says, but that failure derives from a much larger failure of American policy, writes <b>Charles Richardson</b>.

Failure in Afghanistan and how the Iraq war poisoned support for western intervention

Australia’s mission in Afghanistan is a failure, as Fairfax's Hugh White says, but that failure derives from a much larger failure of American policy, writes Charles Richardson.

Friction between AusAID and consultants in Afghanistan -- including a dispute over a photo -- has left Australia without any oversight into its aid program. Freelance journalist <b>Tom Hyland</b> reports.

The thumbs-up and a lack of aid oversight in Afghanistan

Friction between AusAID and consultants in Afghanistan -- including a dispute over a photo -- has left Australia without any oversight into its aid program. Freelance journalist Tom Hyland reports.

A raid to find rogue Afghan army member Hek Matullah by combined Australian and Afghanistan forces resulted in two civilians being killed. <b>Priscilla Pho</b> talks to an expert about rules of engagement during war.

What are Australia’s rules of engagement during war?

A raid to find rogue Afghan army member Hek Matullah by combined Australian and Afghanistan forces resulted in two civilians being killed. Priscilla Pho talks to an expert about rules of engagement during war.

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