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Topic: traffic congestion
Novel fixes for Australian cities to navigate out of traffic congestion

Novel fixes for Australian cities to navigate out of traffic congestion

Australia is lagging behind in its use of traffic-control technology and our cities are struggling. What's slowing us down?

The one solution to easing traffic congestion — but you might not like it

The one solution to easing traffic congestion — but you might not like it

A new report shows governments aren’t doing enough to tackle traffic congestion. Cities can’t build their way out of congestion – they need to charge motorists for use of roads, writes Alan Davies.

Is it better to price road space or promote traffic congestion?

Is it better to price road space or promote traffic congestion?

Putting a price on road space seems like a good idea but some analysts argue it could actually increase the amount of driving. Another option has been floated: promoting traffic congestion, writes Alan Davies.

Skip rush hour — walk home

Skip rush hour — walk home

If you live within seven kilometres of the city, just go straight from work. If you live further out, get off your public transport 5-6 kilometres from home and hoof it the rest of the way. Walking to and from work is much better than spending half an hour stuck under a faceless armpit on the train, writes Crikey reader Hannah Pick.

Should public transport users pay their way?

Should public transport users pay their way?

Public transport capacity has to increase enormously to deal with expected higher demand driven by issues such as peak oil, climate change and unprecedented population growth, writes Alan Davies of the Melbourne Urbanist blog site.

Brisbane’s tunnel vision: numbers look like pie in the sky

Brisbane’s tunnel vision: numbers look like pie in the sky

The original forecasts for Brisbane's new Clem7 tunnel was more than 100,000 trips per day by the middle of next year. These numbers are unrealistic, writes transport expert Peter Quick.

You don’t have to be a roads scholar to work out congestion

You don’t have to be a roads scholar to work out congestion

Urban road transport is a vast public policy failure by governments that costs us billions of dollars a year, but it will go on being tolerated, chiefly because voters won’t accept the solution.