Scroll to top
Topic: theatre reviews
The <em>Brisbane Times</em> has recruited ordinary punters to review the Brisbane Festival. Professional reviewers aren't happy. That and other media tidbits.

Media briefs: Wharfie review … Age literals … Ten’s eye …

The Brisbane Times has recruited ordinary punters to review the Brisbane Festival. Professional reviewers aren't happy. That and other media tidbits.

A small play about a big boy, <em>Beached</em> comes to Griffin Theatre with a strong pedigree. But while the characters are well drawn, it doesn't all come together, writes <b>Lloyd Bradford Syke</b>.

Theatre review: Beached | Griffin Theatre — Sydney

A small play about a big boy, Beached comes to Griffin Theatre with a strong pedigree. But while the characters are well drawn, it doesn't all come together, writes Lloyd Bradford Syke.

Direct from Broadway, Queensland Theatre Company's production of <em>Venus In Fur</em> is a challenging night at the theatre, with assured performances well directed, writes <b>Alison Cotes</b>.

Theatre review: Venus In Fur — Cremorne Theatre, Brisbane

Direct from Broadway, Queensland Theatre Company's production of Venus In Fur is a challenging night at the theatre, with assured performances well directed, writes Alison Cotes.

Caroline O'Connor, perhaps the rightful holder of the First Lady of Musical Theatre mantle, stars in <em>Gypsy</em>, the great American musical. The Production Company break their usual mould with this solid mounting of a classic, writes <b>Byron Bache</b>.

Theatre review: Gypsy — State Theatre, Melbourne

Caroline O'Connor, perhaps the rightful holder of the First Lady of Musical Theatre mantle, stars in Gypsy, the great American musical. The Production Company break their usual mould with this solid mounting of a classic, writes Byron Bache.

This is a monster alright. But not breathing. This listless French farce was practically dead on arrival at the National Art School in Sydney, writes <b>Lloyd Bradford Syke</b>.

Theatre review: Breathing Monster — Cell Block Theatre, Sydney

This is a monster alright. But not breathing. This listless French farce was practically dead on arrival at the National Art School in Sydney, writes Lloyd Bradford Syke.

When one considers what Jack Charles has been through and the lingering effects it's had, his disposition stands as a triumph of equanimity over brutal reality, writes <b>Lloyd Bradford Syke</b>.

Theatre review: Jack Charles v The Crown — Ilbijerri Theatre Company

When one considers what Jack Charles has been through and the lingering effects it's had, his disposition stands as a triumph of equanimity over brutal reality, writes Lloyd Bradford Syke.

NWE's <em>Electra</em> is a tiny tour de force, raising more questions than it answers, which, surely, is the way both ancient Greek and modern Australian drama ought to be, writes <b>Lloyd Bradford Syke</b>.

Theatre review: Electra — Tap Gallery Theatre, Sydney

NWE's Electra is a tiny tour de force, raising more questions than it answers, which, surely, is the way both ancient Greek and modern Australian drama ought to be, writes Lloyd Bradford Syke.

David Williamson's <em>The Removalists</em> is still a violent, bloody, deeply disturbing portrait of Australia. A new production from Tamarama Rock Surfers does it justice, writes <b>Lloyd Bradford Syke</b>.

Theatre review: The Removalists — Bondi Pavillion Theatre, Sydney

David Williamson's The Removalists is still a violent, bloody, deeply disturbing portrait of Australia. A new production from Tamarama Rock Surfers does it justice, writes Lloyd Bradford Syke.

There’s an awkward, eloquent silence to Tom Holloway’s <em>Forget Me Not</em>. It’s one of the finest Belvoir St Theatre productions in quite some time, writes <b>Lloyd Bradford Syke</b>.

Theatre review: Forget Me Not — Belvoir St Theatre, Sydney

There’s an awkward, eloquent silence to Tom Holloway’s Forget Me Not. It’s one of the finest Belvoir St Theatre productions in quite some time, writes Lloyd Bradford Syke.

The Brisbane Arts Theatre revives <em>Frankenstein</em> in the best traditions of the Gothic horror tale. Brenna Lee-Cooney's take is an intense but colourful adaptation, writes <b>Alison Cotes</b>.

Theatre review: Frankenstein — Brisbane Arts Theatre

The Brisbane Arts Theatre revives Frankenstein in the best traditions of the Gothic horror tale. Brenna Lee-Cooney's take is an intense but colourful adaptation, writes Alison Cotes.

Page 1 of 23
There are 230 articles in theatre reviews