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Topic: Thailand economy
The military junta that controls Thailand is looking every inch a dictatorship.

Yingluck is right, democracy is dead in Thailand

The military junta that controls Thailand is looking every inch a dictatorship.

Last year, the share markets in most Asian countries put in stellar performances. The Thai share market, for instance, rose by 50.8%, while the Malaysian share market climbed 32.5% and there's little sign that inflationary pressures in the Asian economies will abate any time soon, writes <b>Karen Maley</b>.

Maley: jumping off the Asia bandwagon

Last year, the share markets in most Asian countries put in stellar performances. The Thai share market, for instance, rose by 50.8%, while the Malaysian share market climbed 32.5% and there's little sign that inflationary pressures in the Asian economies will abate any time soon, writes Karen Maley.

Now that Thailand is slowly getting back to something approaching civility, it's time for an accounting. A lot of unquantifiable damage done to the country's reputation by the disorder, but we won't find out until much later in the year if the economic fabric of the economy has been affected.

Thailand prepares for economic rebuild after the violence

Now that Thailand is slowly getting back to something approaching civility, it's time for an accounting. A lot of unquantifiable damage done to the country's reputation by the disorder, but we won't find out until much later in the year if the economic fabric of the economy has been affected.

The violent clashes between protesters and government forces in Thailand could have dire consequences for the country's recovering economy, as locals stop shopping and tourists stop arriving.

Thailand: blood in the streets and in the markets

The violent clashes between protesters and government forces in Thailand could have dire consequences for the country's recovering economy, as locals stop shopping and tourists stop arriving.

There are 4 articles in Thailand economy