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Topic: soft drinks

With the fizz going out of Coke sales, Coca-Cola Amatil turns elsewhere

Coke sales have gone flat, but Coca-Cola Amatil still has a few hundred brands up its sleeve. How is it staving off the decline of the world's most popular drink?

Jamie Oliver wants Australia to introduce a 15% tax on soft drinks. But some industry experts say the success of such a measure is about as likely as producing one of the celebrity chef's meals in a quarter of an hour. <em>Crikey</em> intern <b>Emer McCarthy</b> reports.

Should Australia introduce a soft drink tax?

Jamie Oliver wants Australia to introduce a 15% tax on soft drinks. But some industry experts say the success of such a measure is about as likely as producing one of the celebrity chef's meals in a quarter of an hour. Crikey intern Emer McCarthy reports.

Despite an increase in their disposable income, US consumers aren't spending. And other business tidbits of the day.

Business bites: consumers won’t spend … iron ore descends … oil slump trend …

Despite an increase in their disposable income, US consumers aren't spending. And other business tidbits of the day.

The reality of the alcohol and beverage industry fits poorly with efforts to dismiss them as evil vectors of disease. The real data on health tells a different story.

The reality behind Big Grog and other villains of the public health debate

The reality of the alcohol and beverage industry fits poorly with efforts to dismiss them as evil vectors of disease. The real data on health tells a different story.

For a few years there Americans were turning to healthy and energy drink alternatives. But the recession came and with it a sharp increase in soft drink sales, up 2.5% in 2009.

Economy down but soda bubbles along

For a few years there Americans were turning to healthy and energy drink alternatives. But the recession came and with it a sharp increase in soft drink sales, up 2.5% in 2009.

Soft drinks dispensed from fountains and machines (like you get at pubs and the movies) are an absolute price-gouge, <em>Wallet Pop</em> explains: it costs Coke $2.60 to manufacture enough syrupy goop for 50,000 drinks.

$1 Coke? Still a rip-off

Soft drinks dispensed from fountains and machines (like you get at pubs and the movies) are an absolute price-gouge, Wallet Pop explains: it costs Coke $2.60 to manufacture enough syrupy goop for 50,000 drinks.

It’s time to wake up, smell the (unsweetened) coffee and act on sugar before we sentence even more Australians to death by pancreatic cancer.

Soda pop not that soft: fizzy drinks linked to pancreatic cancer

It’s time to wake up, smell the (unsweetened) coffee and act on sugar before we sentence even more Australians to death by pancreatic cancer.

In the name of getting enough water, Australia's school canteens are selling kids a drink sweetened with 21g of pure fructose. When did we become a nation requiring constant hydration, anyway?

Why fructose-laden drinks when there’s a healthy option on tap?

In the name of getting enough water, Australia's school canteens are selling kids a drink sweetened with 21g of pure fructose. When did we become a nation requiring constant hydration, anyway?

Discussion about the soft drink industry's <a href="http://www.crikey.com.au/2009/10/21/drinking-with-the-enemy-the-soft-drink-marketing-wars/">recent forays into public health</a> is heating up, with <a href="http://blogs.crikey.com.au/croakey/2009/10/22/pepsico-responds/">PepsiCo</a>, the <a href="http://blogs.crikey.com.au/croakey/2009/10/21/whats-the-real-story-on-soft-drinks-and-public-health/">Cancer Council</a>, <a href="http://blogs.crikey.com.au/croakey/2009/10/22/the-soft-drink-wars-heat-up/">obesity experts</a> and a host of others weighing-in.

The soft drink wars heat up

Discussion about the soft drink industry's recent forays into public health is heating up, with PepsiCo, the Cancer Council, obesity experts and a host of others weighing-in.

Soft drink giants Coca-Cola and PepsiCo are locked in a neck-and-neck battle to become new best friends of public health. It’s what you do when your industry is facing flak as an enemy of public health, writes <b>Melissa Sweet</b>.

Drinking with the enemy: the soft drink marketing wars

Soft drink giants Coca-Cola and PepsiCo are locked in a neck-and-neck battle to become new best friends of public health. It’s what you do when your industry is facing flak as an enemy of public health, writes Melissa Sweet.

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There are 15 articles in soft drinks