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Topic: public hospital reform
Remember all that federal Labor arty talk about finally fixing the financing of the public hospital system? Well, forget them. The first state to make a mockery of the new system was Tasmania, writes <b>Richard Farmer</b>.

The same old public hospital nonsense

Remember all that federal Labor arty talk about finally fixing the financing of the public hospital system? Well, forget them. The first state to make a mockery of the new system was Tasmania, writes Richard Farmer.

<b>Melissa Sweet</b> offers a rather brutal summary of health reforms: a lot of money is being spent for most uncertain outcomes, while reforms seem to benefit the pharmaceutical industries more than the public purse.

Your guide to the health/aged care reforms

Melissa Sweet offers a rather brutal summary of health reforms: a lot of money is being spent for most uncertain outcomes, while reforms seem to benefit the pharmaceutical industries more than the public purse.

Do-gooder Health minister Nicola Roxon is ruining it for all Australians who want to destroy their health with booze, bacon and cigarettes, says <b>David Penberthy</b>

Penberthy: Roxon the party pooper

Do-gooder Health minister Nicola Roxon is ruining it for all Australians who want to destroy their health with booze, bacon and cigarettes, says David Penberthy

Policy announcements don’t mean a lot until you see the actual money committed in the Budget, and this time the health sector was pleasantly surprised, writes <b>Carol Bennett</b>.

Budget 2010: why the health funding was such a ‘surreal’ experience

Policy announcements don’t mean a lot until you see the actual money committed in the Budget, and this time the health sector was pleasantly surprised, writes Carol Bennett.

On top of the public hospital reform spending already announced with the COAG agreement, the 2010 Budget invests a further $2.2 billion over four years in health and hospital reform.

Health continues to top the charts

On top of the public hospital reform spending already announced with the COAG agreement, the 2010 Budget invests a further $2.2 billion over four years in health and hospital reform.

The Health Department may be able to write a chook raffle policy, but it has few employees with much experience of running health services, and too many decision-making generic career bureaucrats without any clinical background, says psychiatrist <b>Alan Rosen</b>.

Are we going back to the 1960s in mental health?

The Health Department may be able to write a chook raffle policy, but it has few employees with much experience of running health services, and too many decision-making generic career bureaucrats without any clinical background, says psychiatrist Alan Rosen.

Cost-shifting, blame-shifting and patient-shifting are an integral part of our health system, and the COAG health reforms are unlikely to signal their demise, writes Sydney emergency registrar <b>Dr Clare Skinner</b>.

How hospital emergency departments are forced to “sell” patients

Cost-shifting, blame-shifting and patient-shifting are an integral part of our health system, and the COAG health reforms are unlikely to signal their demise, writes Sydney emergency registrar Dr Clare Skinner.

Kevin Rudd has won support for his sweeping health reforms among voters, according to a new Essential Research poll, with most believing it will have a positive impact on health services.

Essential: Voters back health plan, optimistic about change

Kevin Rudd has won support for his sweeping health reforms among voters, according to a new Essential Research poll, with most believing it will have a positive impact on health services.

Why couldn't Victoria -- a state with a strong track record of managing hospitals -- continue to operate its health care system as normal as a trial? Why didn't we embrace competitive federalism? asks <b>Graeme Orr</b>.

Health reforms: all posturing and political theatre

Why couldn't Victoria -- a state with a strong track record of managing hospitals -- continue to operate its health care system as normal as a trial? Why didn't we embrace competitive federalism? asks Graeme Orr.

Kevin Rudd is coming out of the health reforms looking a little awkward -- lots of extra cash was given away and WA still isn't on board -- but he still looks a lot healthier than backed-into-a-corner Tony Abbott, writes <b>Michelle Grattan</b>.

Grattan: Both parties are sick when it comes to health

Kevin Rudd is coming out of the health reforms looking a little awkward -- lots of extra cash was given away and WA still isn't on board -- but he still looks a lot healthier than backed-into-a-corner Tony Abbott, writes Michelle Grattan.

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