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Topic: privacy
Amazon’s facial recognition technology comes at a cost

Amazon’s facial recognition technology comes at a cost

Amazon's new facial recognition technology is a game-changer for brands wanting to optimise customer experience. But it also raises significant privacy concerns.

When can the government tap your phone or read your texts?

When can the government tap your phone or read your texts?

What exactly are your rights? Who can access your call history, check your messages or listen in on your conversation, and when?

Victoria wants to party like it’s 1984

Victoria wants to party like it’s 1984

The Victorian government wants to harvest the data of its citizens en masse. But doing so would undermine the state's human rights charter and the principles it is meant to protect.

Will consumers get a look-in when it comes to breaking up Big Tech?

Will consumers get a look-in when it comes to breaking up Big Tech?

The regulatory tide has turned against big tech companies with a vengeance — but will consumer interests be addressed in the rush to regulate?

When it comes to data, Big Tech isn’t the only threat to our privacy

When it comes to data, Big Tech isn’t the only threat to our privacy

While the focus on the abuse of personal data has been on the major tech companies, banks have been engaged in the same process for years.

Why old media is upset over ACCC action on digital privacy

Why old media is upset over ACCC action on digital privacy

The ACCC is trying to get to grips with how to regulate Google and Facebook. You'd think that would be good news to the groups currently being dominated...

Fourteen easy tips to avoid looking like Big Brother

Fourteen easy tips to avoid looking like Big Brother

Human Services Minister Michael Keenan is sick of the government being portrayed as Big Brother. Maybe if it stopped behaving in ways straight out of 1984, he wouldn't have that problem.

Encryption laws will target whistleblowers, journalists, civil society groups

Encryption laws will target whistleblowers, journalists, civil society groups

The government's war on encryption inevitably means whistleblowers, journalists, lawyers and opposition politicians will be targeted by security agencies, like they have with mass surveillance laws.

Australia will reap what it sows with anti-encryption laws

Australia will reap what it sows with anti-encryption laws

Crikey readers discuss anti-encryption and freedom of religion laws.

Australians set to become guinea pigs for worldwide war on privacy

Australians set to become guinea pigs for worldwide war on privacy

Australians are ripe for targeting in the war on encryption because we have no human rights or privacy protections and no effective oversight of security agencies.