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Topic: news cycle
Prime Minister Scott Morrison (Image: AAP/Mick Tsikas)

How the 96-hour news cycle has changed journalism forever

The 96-hour news cycle, instigated by social media, has shifted the balance of power in Australian media and politics.

How long before the traditional news cycle dies?

If this summer's news has taught us anything, it's that traditional media cycle is on life-support, and the end may be closer than you think.

The confected ‘strangeness’ of the Tromps, Sully, and our growing obsession with the weird

What if media audiences are tired of the ritualistic reporting cycles through which journalists seek to tame and explain strange events? What if all they want is the mystery?

Don't listen to what's happening in Europe. Don't watch updates on natural disasters overseas from your safe house in Australia. Your worrying isn't fixing the world, so stop doing it, argues <b>John Birmingham</b>.

Birmingham: Stop reading the news

Don't listen to what's happening in Europe. Don't watch updates on natural disasters overseas from your safe house in Australia. Your worrying isn't fixing the world, so stop doing it, argues John Birmingham.

If mainstream media outlets spend their diminishing resources in a futile battle to be first, then they will race themselves out of business to no useful end. That is not where resources should be deployed.

Simons: being first, or being right?

If mainstream media outlets spend their diminishing resources in a futile battle to be first, then they will race themselves out of business to no useful end. That is not where resources should be deployed.

The problem with 24 hour news channels is that there constantly needs to be something (anything!) happening just to fill up the air time. Luckily, notes <em>The Onion</em>, there is always some bullshit happening somewhere.

And now for some witty filler

The problem with 24 hour news channels is that there constantly needs to be something (anything!) happening just to fill up the air time. Luckily, notes The Onion, there is always some bullshit happening somewhere.

A fascinating look at how one little non-verified rumour about New York Governor David Paterson spread from a tabloid tip in the <em>New York Post</em> to Twitter, then the blogosphere, and finally into the mainstream media

Charting the fake-news cycle

A fascinating look at how one little non-verified rumour about New York Governor David Paterson spread from a tabloid tip in the New York Post to Twitter, then the blogosphere, and finally into the mainstream media

<em>New York Mag</em> chose seven random news stories from a random day, and tracked them backwards to determine who was actually responsible for the individual pieces of original reporting that advanced each one. Then they charted it. Brilliant.

Who really breaks the big news?

New York Mag chose seven random news stories from a random day, and tracked them backwards to determine who was actually responsible for the individual pieces of original reporting that advanced each one. Then they charted it. Brilliant.

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