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With the advent of e-publishing technology comes a range of related issues such as regularly revised texts. What are the implications for books that "are never done being written?" <b>Bethanie Blanchard</b> discusses.

E-publishing and the dangers of malleability

With the advent of e-publishing technology comes a range of related issues such as regularly revised texts. What are the implications for books that "are never done being written?" Bethanie Blanchard discusses.

Powerful bookseller Amazon announced that for the first time since it began selling e-books -- and its succesful Kindle e-reader -- four years ago, it now sells 105 e-books for every 100 printed book.

Life in the Amazon: e-books outsell the printed word

Powerful bookseller Amazon announced that for the first time since it began selling e-books -- and its succesful Kindle e-reader -- four years ago, it now sells 105 e-books for every 100 printed book.

Amazon's Kindle e-reader gets a lot of flack for hurting local booksellers and now 11,000 libraries in the US will soon offer Kindle e-books for short-term lending.

Read library books on your Kindle

Amazon's Kindle e-reader gets a lot of flack for hurting local booksellers and now 11,000 libraries in the US will soon offer Kindle e-books for short-term lending.

If you thought Apple's iPad had seized control of the e-reader industry and obliterated the competition, think again. The Kindle is far from dead. According to new figures from Amazon, the digital reading device is actually more popular than ever.

The Kindle is alive and well

If you thought Apple's iPad had seized control of the e-reader industry and obliterated the competition, think again. The Kindle is far from dead. According to new figures from Amazon, the digital reading device is actually more popular than ever.

With Amazon offering increasingly cut-price e-books, the publishing industry is looking to Apple's iPad to kill the Kindle and save the book business. But is Steve Jobs really looking after the interests of publishers, or just his own legacy?

Will Apple save or destroy the publishing industry?

With Amazon offering increasingly cut-price e-books, the publishing industry is looking to Apple's iPad to kill the Kindle and save the book business. But is Steve Jobs really looking after the interests of publishers, or just his own legacy?

Screw Microsoft, the biggest worry for Google is Apple and its iPad. Why? Because when you play online with your iPad or iPhone -- reading newspapers, checking the weather etc -- you use apps, not Google.

Will iPad kill Google?

Screw Microsoft, the biggest worry for Google is Apple and its iPad. Why? Because when you play online with your iPad or iPhone -- reading newspapers, checking the weather etc -- you use apps, not Google.

Microsoft has truckloads of cash, employs some of the smartest people on Earth, and, until recently, completely dominated the computer industry. So how come it didn't invent the iPad, iPod, BlackBerry or Kindle? Former VP <b>Dick Brass</b> explains.

Former VP: How Microsoft lost its cool

Microsoft has truckloads of cash, employs some of the smartest people on Earth, and, until recently, completely dominated the computer industry. So how come it didn't invent the iPad, iPod, BlackBerry or Kindle? Former VP Dick Brass explains.

For anyone confused by all the hype about e-readers and the "digital revolution" in the book publishing world, this article breaks it down perfectly: how Amazon makes money with the Kindle, how Apple will from the iPad, and why publishers are pissed off.

The new economics of book publishing explained

For anyone confused by all the hype about e-readers and the "digital revolution" in the book publishing world, this article breaks it down perfectly: how Amazon makes money with the Kindle, how Apple will from the iPad, and why publishers are pissed off.

After <a href="http://www.amazon.com/">Amazon</a> last week pulled all the Macmillan published books from its online shelves following a dispute over pricing of e-books, Amazon has caved and raised the prices as per Macmillan's wishes. Is this the first defeat in the Kindle vs. iPad war?

Destroying the Amazon

After Amazon last week pulled all the Macmillan published books from its online shelves following a dispute over pricing of e-books, Amazon has caved and raised the prices as per Macmillan's wishes. Is this the first defeat in the Kindle vs. iPad war?

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