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Topic: jobs
A year of insult and injury for job seekers and the unemployed

A year of insult and injury for job seekers and the unemployed

This year was an annus horribilis for the poor — but the tireless campaigning of low-income advocates offers some hope for the future.

Bringing interviews in for questioning

Bringing interviews in for questioning

Welcome to For Your Information, where Helen Razer explains a topic of global, local or, occasionally, no significance. Today, Helen asks some tough questions of job interviews.

The death of manufacturing — overrated and overstated

The death of manufacturing — overrated and overstated

Australian manufacturing isn't as dead as some make out. And so what if it is?

Crikey hunts for a newshound

Crikey hunts for a newshound

The bunker is growing.

Razer: David Graeber cuts through the bullshit

Razer: David Graeber cuts through the bullshit

Next to academic David Graeber, Jordan Peterson is a xerox of Malcolm Gladwell’s rejected TED talk notes on the topic of “Chicks: they’re just like that”

A million jobs created despite so-called ‘punitive’ company tax

A million jobs created despite so-called ‘punitive’ company tax

The government is justifiably proud of its employment achievements -- but it's been done without a company tax cut, and it hasn't helped wages.

Our ‘draconian’ company tax rate produces yet more record jobs growth

Our ‘draconian’ company tax rate produces yet more record jobs growth

Either Australia's jobs market is booming, or we desperately need a company tax cut. Both those things can't be true at the same time, Glenn Dyer and Bernard Keane write.

While we obsess over scandal, what’s happening on policy?

While we obsess over scandal, what’s happening on policy?

While the governing class examines its own navel for scandal, what's happening on the most important policy issues?

Who’s really to thank for our jobs boom?

Who’s really to thank for our jobs boom?

The strong jobs growth under Malcolm Turnbull and Scott Morrison is due to the government's health and education spending, and low interest rates, not a buoyant private sector.

Australian trickle-down economics is dead: the five final nails in ScoMo’s fiscal coffin

Australian trickle-down economics is dead: the five final nails in ScoMo’s fiscal coffin

It's hard to imagine a more compelling series of reports to argue against Scott Morrison's version of trickle-down economics, writes economics reporter Alan Austin.