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Topic: Japan nuclear disaster
The people of Fukushima face sadness and tough decisions -- but some have found hope, writes Australian nuclear radiologist <b>Dr Peter Karamoskos</b>, who visited the region last month.

Geiger counters, empty playgrounds: dispatch from Fukushima

The people of Fukushima face sadness and tough decisions -- but some have found hope, writes Australian nuclear radiologist Dr Peter Karamoskos, who visited the region last month.

If it wasn’t for a metallic taste and strange, powdery sensation on her skin, Sato Sachiko could have almost believed nothing changed in "beautiful Fukushima" after March 11, writes <b>Jane Barraclough</b>, an Australian freelance journalist living in Okinawa.

Japan and the battle to find radiation-free food

If it wasn’t for a metallic taste and strange, powdery sensation on her skin, Sato Sachiko could have almost believed nothing changed in "beautiful Fukushima" after March 11, writes Jane Barraclough, an Australian freelance journalist living in Okinawa.

On March 11, Japan will commemorate the first anniversary of the Tohoku earthquake, tsunami and Fukushima nuclear disaster, writes <b>Craig Mark</b>, of Kwansei Gakuin University's School of International Studies.

Japanese politics still unstable, one year after 3/11

On March 11, Japan will commemorate the first anniversary of the Tohoku earthquake, tsunami and Fukushima nuclear disaster, writes Craig Mark, of Kwansei Gakuin University's School of International Studies.

I don't see how any government can justify the use of a technology that can inflict so much chaos if it goes wrong, writes <b>Paul Johannessen</b>, a writer and videographer, in the Japanese town of Kesennuma.

If Fukushima goes to shit again, maybe Jesus is onto something

I don't see how any government can justify the use of a technology that can inflict so much chaos if it goes wrong, writes Paul Johannessen, a writer and videographer, in the Japanese town of Kesennuma.

Last week two esteemed Japanese entrepreneurs weighed into the debate about the future of nuclear energy. Passionate discussion aside, one thing they agreed on was that another disaster would seal the industry's fate, reports <b>Kazuaki Nagata</b>.

Fukushima sparks ‘unprecedented’ public debate in Japan

Last week two esteemed Japanese entrepreneurs weighed into the debate about the future of nuclear energy. Passionate discussion aside, one thing they agreed on was that another disaster would seal the industry's fate, reports Kazuaki Nagata.

It's been five months since the devastating Japan earthquake and resulting tsunami and most of the clean-up is complete. But is chucking dirt contaminated with nuclear waste just a few feet underground a viable long-term solution?

Where will Japan’s radioactive waste go?

It's been five months since the devastating Japan earthquake and resulting tsunami and most of the clean-up is complete. But is chucking dirt contaminated with nuclear waste just a few feet underground a viable long-term solution?

More gravely serious truths about the severity of the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster following the earthquake and tsunami of March 11 have emerged.

Fukushima disaster: worse than Hiroshima

More gravely serious truths about the severity of the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster following the earthquake and tsunami of March 11 have emerged.

Prime Minister Naoto Kan has stated he may soon resign from office, keeping Japan in its pattern of an annual transition of premiership. It seems he has no choice. In the face of disaster the political sideshow rolls on, writes <b>Dr Craig Mark</b> from Tokyo.

Disaster, debt and despair: but Japan’s political sideshow rolls on

Prime Minister Naoto Kan has stated he may soon resign from office, keeping Japan in its pattern of an annual transition of premiership. It seems he has no choice. In the face of disaster the political sideshow rolls on, writes Dr Craig Mark from Tokyo.

Attempting to censor a public already starved of meaningful information on the threat posed to their long-term health seems counter-productive, writes <b>Dan Bray</b>, a freelance journalist and former Japan resident.

Censorship of Fukushima information leaves Japan in fear

Attempting to censor a public already starved of meaningful information on the threat posed to their long-term health seems counter-productive, writes Dan Bray, a freelance journalist and former Japan resident.

Up to two thirds of the current 54 reactors will be offline or shut for inspection in the next couple of months.

Post-Fukushima crisis, worldwide move to power down nukes

Up to two thirds of the current 54 reactors will be offline or shut for inspection in the next couple of months.