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Topic: Iran elections
Iran's presidential election looks as if it might be more exciting than anyone expected, writes <b>Charles Richardson</b>, with a surge in support for the most moderate candidate.

Election preview: Iran

Iran's presidential election looks as if it might be more exciting than anyone expected, writes Charles Richardson, with a surge in support for the most moderate candidate.

Government repression works. For months after Iran's elections, Green Movement protests continued in the streets. But now, the streets are quiet as all the protesters are either locked up or shutting up, reports <b>Stephen Kinzer</b> from Iran.

It’s all over for Iran

Government repression works. For months after Iran's elections, Green Movement protests continued in the streets. But now, the streets are quiet as all the protesters are either locked up or shutting up, reports Stephen Kinzer from Iran.

<em>Newsweek</em> journalist <b>Maziar Bahari</b> was thrown into an Iranian prison for 118 days and then sentenced in absentia to 13 years imprisonment and 74 lashes. What did he do to receive such a punishment?

I reported on the Iran elections and all I got was a lousy 13 years in prison

Newsweek journalist Maziar Bahari was thrown into an Iranian prison for 118 days and then sentenced in absentia to 13 years imprisonment and 74 lashes. What did he do to receive such a punishment?

An Iranian dissident gives a first-hand account of the latest violence on the streets of Tehran since Ashura: how members of the Green Movement are capturing militiamen, the battles between police and protesters and their disappointment in the actions of Barack Obama.

What it’s really like to be a dissident in Iran

An Iranian dissident gives a first-hand account of the latest violence on the streets of Tehran since Ashura: how members of the Green Movement are capturing militiamen, the battles between police and protesters and their disappointment in the actions of Barack Obama.

It's not a revolution that seems inevitable for Iran, but rather civil war and social breakdown as the government and opposition divide the nation along religious and political lines. <b>Abbas Barzegar</b> reports from Iran.

Iran on the brink of civil war

It's not a revolution that seems inevitable for Iran, but rather civil war and social breakdown as the government and opposition divide the nation along religious and political lines. Abbas Barzegar reports from Iran.

Iran is moving from election protests into a full scale civil disobedience campaign, and Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khameni to blame, says <b>Meir Javedanfar</b>. Can Khameni save his regime or is its demise inevitable?

The second Iranian revolution?

Iran is moving from election protests into a full scale civil disobedience campaign, and Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khameni to blame, says Meir Javedanfar. Can Khameni save his regime or is its demise inevitable?

An Iranian student looks back the vibrant history of student protests in Iran. Although today's pulsating Iranian youth movement faces a unique set of challenges, it has the potential to change the country's politics.

From the revolution to election rebellion: a history of student protests in Iran

An Iranian student looks back the vibrant history of student protests in Iran. Although today's pulsating Iranian youth movement faces a unique set of challenges, it has the potential to change the country's politics.

Iranian students are back out on the streets demonstrating, in the biggest wave of protests since the disputed June elections. But the movement is shifting from against Ahmadinejad to wider Iranian political complaints.

Iran’s radical street revolution is back

Iranian students are back out on the streets demonstrating, in the biggest wave of protests since the disputed June elections. But the movement is shifting from against Ahmadinejad to wider Iranian political complaints.

With the protests surrounding the Iranian elections, it raises a difficult question for young Iranians, writes <b>Gabby Haynes</b>, fight or flee? With an estimated 150,000 Iranians leaving every year, how can change come about if no one fights for it?

Iran: stay and fight or leave and live?

With the protests surrounding the Iranian elections, it raises a difficult question for young Iranians, writes Gabby Haynes, fight or flee? With an estimated 150,000 Iranians leaving every year, how can change come about if no one fights for it?

Iranian opposition protesters are again taking to the streets, as officials mark the 30th anniversary of the US embassy in Tehran being taken hostage. Protesters are being reportedly beaten, injured and arrested. <em>The Guardian</em> live blogs the uprising.

Iran’s opposition protests return: a live blog

Iranian opposition protesters are again taking to the streets, as officials mark the 30th anniversary of the US embassy in Tehran being taken hostage. Protesters are being reportedly beaten, injured and arrested. The Guardian live blogs the uprising.

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