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Topic: health reform
Many proponents of community health models are less than overjoyed by the way the proposed health reform changes have taken shape, even though some are potentially very valuable, writes <b>Lyn Morgain</b>.

What happened to the vision for primary healthcare reform?

Many proponents of community health models are less than overjoyed by the way the proposed health reform changes have taken shape, even though some are potentially very valuable, writes Lyn Morgain.

Gillard’s broken promise

A classic example of the blame game. The buck passing on public hospital funding is well and truly back. The Tasmanian government this week announced it would cut more than $60 million from its elective surgery budget over the next three years. That means, according to federal Health Minister Nicola Roxon, that the state risks […]

Remember all that federal Labor arty talk about finally fixing the financing of the public hospital system? Well, forget them. The first state to make a mockery of the new system was Tasmania, writes <b>Richard Farmer</b>.

The same old public hospital nonsense

Remember all that federal Labor arty talk about finally fixing the financing of the public hospital system? Well, forget them. The first state to make a mockery of the new system was Tasmania, writes Richard Farmer.

If the current rate of growth in hospital admissions in Australia continues, private hospitals can expect to be treating 50% of all hospital patients by 2021. Imagine if the public sector alone had to undertake all this work, writes <b>Michael Roff</b>, CEO of the Australian Private Hospitals Association.

Give me a rebate, public hospitals need private health insurance

If the current rate of growth in hospital admissions in Australia continues, private hospitals can expect to be treating 50% of all hospital patients by 2021. Imagine if the public sector alone had to undertake all this work, writes Michael Roff, CEO of the Australian Private Hospitals Association.

The Government's health reform package is far less than originally conceived, but it will deliver long-term benefits. The real beneficiaries will be the taxpayers of the next three decades.

Benefits of health reform will be in decades ahead

The Government's health reform package is far less than originally conceived, but it will deliver long-term benefits. The real beneficiaries will be the taxpayers of the next three decades.

If health reform was a baby, you’d have to say that it’s facing an exceedingly tough start to life.

Health reform: you wouldn’t wish it on a baby

If health reform was a baby, you’d have to say that it’s facing an exceedingly tough start to life.

Labor has edged ahead in today's Essential report poll - but Julia Gillard doesn't compare favourably to her predecessor.

Essential: Labor edges up, but voters rate Rudd as PM …

Labor has edged ahead in today's Essential report poll - but Julia Gillard doesn't compare favourably to her predecessor.

The Business Council of Australia have released a report that argues for a more transformative health reform agenda and process than what has been on the table to date, reports <b>Melissa Sweet</b>.

Health reform: does it go far enough?

The Business Council of Australia have released a report that argues for a more transformative health reform agenda and process than what has been on the table to date, reports Melissa Sweet.

Drawing breath after a very busy year, <b>Carol Bennett</b> from the <b>Consumers Health Forum</b> reflects on what has been achieved in health reform in Australia and what lies in store for the future.

Health reform: where have we been and where are we headed?

Drawing breath after a very busy year, Carol Bennett from the Consumers Health Forum reflects on what has been achieved in health reform in Australia and what lies in store for the future.

Last month the Menzies Centre for Health Policy released a survey measuring Australian perceptions of our health system. A number of the same questions were asked in a 2008 survey and contrasting the responses reveals how Australian opinion has changed, writes <b>Possum Comitatus</b>.

What we think of our health system

Last month the Menzies Centre for Health Policy released a survey measuring Australian perceptions of our health system. A number of the same questions were asked in a 2008 survey and contrasting the responses reveals how Australian opinion has changed, writes Possum Comitatus.

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