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Topic: facial recognition
The death of liberalism and the rise of ‘authentocrats’

The death of liberalism and the rise of ‘authentocrats’

Welcome to Side View — a curated guide to new and overlooked content on politics, policy, and public affairs. This week: the coming facial dystopia, Communists vs Aliens, and the data on Australian sexual assault.

Face off: technology leaves regulators scrambling

Face off: technology leaves regulators scrambling

From airline lounges to cricket matches, our faces are already being read everywhere. But what's protecting us from misuse of that data?

Crikey Worm: Dutton’s power grabs

Crikey Worm: Dutton’s power grabs

Good morning, early birds. Peter Dutton has his hands full juggling multiple power grabs. Plus, could we have a referendum on section 44 as soon as the next election? It's the news you need to know, with Chris Woods.

Crikey Worm: Barnaby says rent-free apartment not a ‘palace’

Crikey Worm: Barnaby says rent-free apartment not a ‘palace’

Good morning, early birds. Barnaby Joyce has given Farifax the first exclusive peek of his rent-free Armidale apartment (much to the chagrin of the News Corp tabloids). Plus, Adani has pushed back a self-imposed deadline to fund its controversial coal project. It's the news you need to know, with Max Chalmers.

Stealing your eyeballs: Dutton’s stealthy plan to track you

Stealing your eyeballs: Dutton’s stealthy plan to track you

The government is attempting to establish the basis for collecting Australians' most personal data by stealth, having failed to do it by legislation, write Bernard Keane and Josh Taylor.

Enter the age of facial technology advertising

Enter the age of facial technology advertising

Facial recognition technology will usher in a new era of advertising in which digital boards scan faces and present tailored commercials. There are, of course, many privacy concerns, writes Shan Li and David Sarno.

The eyebrows have it

The eyebrows have it

In an MIT study, subjects were asked to identify celebrities by altered photos: without eyebrows, and without eyes. Apparently eyebrows were more helpful. You be the judge, says W H Chong