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Topic: Eric Beecher

Beecher: the days of dirty secrets and blokey media culture are over

Over the past six months, that whistle has blown the lid off the culture of offensive male abuse in media (especially television) companies.

Beecher: civic journalism and the conspiracy of denial at the top

The demise of journalism as civic good is a defining story of this generation. Just don't expect to read about it.

Everyone agrees we need to reform Australia's institutions. But no one at yesterday's gabfest gave any specifics as to how to do it.

Talk is cheap: we need action, not more hot air, on reform

Everyone agrees we need to reform Australia's institutions. But no one at yesterday's gabfest gave any specifics as to how to do it.

In the final installment of a five-part series, Private Media’s publisher looks at how media moguls wield power behind closed doors, and influence important societal outcomes.

Beecher: the thrill of power

In the final installment of a five-part series, Private Media’s publisher looks at how media moguls wield power behind closed doors, and influence important societal outcomes.

In the fourth of a five-part series, Private Media's publisher answers the question, just how does Rupert Murdoch exercise such fearsome power over world leaders?

Beecher: how to manage politicians

In the fourth of a five-part series, Private Media's publisher answers the question, just how does Rupert Murdoch exercise such fearsome power over world leaders?

In the third part of a five-part series, Private Media's publisher says of course Rupert Murdoch does not sit there barking out orders to his editors about what he wants to see in the paper. He does not have to.

Beecher: the myth of Murdoch’s power

In the third part of a five-part series, Private Media's publisher says of course Rupert Murdoch does not sit there barking out orders to his editors about what he wants to see in the paper. He does not have to.

In part two of a five-part series on the power of media, Private Media's chairman examines how News Corp wields its considerable power.

Beecher: the shadow of power

In part two of a five-part series on the power of media, Private Media's chairman examines how News Corp wields its considerable power.

In the first of a five-part series on the power of the media, Private Media's chairman reveals what happens when you cross Rupert Murdoch.

Beecher: the rules of engagement

In the first of a five-part series on the power of the media, Private Media's chairman reveals what happens when you cross Rupert Murdoch.

The most powerful man in Australian politics is not an elected politician. It's Chris Mitchell, editor-in-chief of <em>The Australian</em>.

Beecher: Tony Abbott’s fate lies in this man’s hands

The most powerful man in Australian politics is not an elected politician. It's Chris Mitchell, editor-in-chief of The Australian.

Business journalists don't rate ASIC to hold businesses to account, so believe their work to be vital. But it's declining, at the same time papers devote more time to other investigations. Legal challenges, and the concerns of advertisers, take their toll.

Watchdog or Lapdog: business journalism is faltering while other investigations rise

Business journalists don't rate ASIC to hold businesses to account, so believe their work to be vital. But it's declining, at the same time papers devote more time to other investigations. Legal challenges, and the concerns of advertisers, take their toll.