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Topic: Copenhagen Climate Change Conference
For climate change policy, last year ended with two contradictory scenes: one, the successful passage through parliament of Australia’s carbon price laws; the other, the dispiriting conclusion to the international climate change talks in Durban, writes <b>Fergus Green</b>, a lawyer and policy analyst specialising in climate change.

What happened to the consensus on climate change?

For climate change policy, last year ended with two contradictory scenes: one, the successful passage through parliament of Australia’s carbon price laws; the other, the dispiriting conclusion to the international climate change talks in Durban, writes Fergus Green, a lawyer and policy analyst specialising in climate change.

Canada’s reversal on Kyoto won’t undermine the sense that the Durban climate conference achieved more than many expected, writes <b>Michael Jacobs</b> of <a href="http://www.inside.org.au/" target="_blank"><em>Inside Story</em></a>.

Durban revealed climate’s many shifting allegiances

Canada’s reversal on Kyoto won’t undermine the sense that the Durban climate conference achieved more than many expected, writes Michael Jacobs of Inside Story.

The UN climate change talks begin today in Durban in much the same way they have since 1995 -- with rhetoric about why the world needs to act but virtually no agreement on how or when.

Parkinson: Durban talks off to a bad start

The UN climate change talks begin today in Durban in much the same way they have since 1995 -- with rhetoric about why the world needs to act but virtually no agreement on how or when.

Amid predictable exchanges of hysteria and jubilation from the warring factions in the carbon price debate, a more fundamental set of concerns about Ross Garnaut's advice has been missed, writes <b>Fergus Green</b>, a lawyer and policy analyst specialising in climate change.

Garnaut still distracted by the search for the ‘holy grail’

Amid predictable exchanges of hysteria and jubilation from the warring factions in the carbon price debate, a more fundamental set of concerns about Ross Garnaut's advice has been missed, writes Fergus Green, a lawyer and policy analyst specialising in climate change.

Cancun will restore confidence among governments and business that action is going to occur, writes Michael Jacobs, and that makes progress more likely.

Cancun: the glass-half-full outlook

Cancun will restore confidence among governments and business that action is going to occur, writes Michael Jacobs, and that makes progress more likely.

A lead veil is shielding commentators from the extent of international action on pollution and climate change, writes <b>John Connor</b>, CEO The Climate Institute.

FOI lifts veil on our ignorance of international pollution action

A lead veil is shielding commentators from the extent of international action on pollution and climate change, writes John Connor, CEO The Climate Institute.

Like Australia, the US has just abandoned plans for an emissions trading scheme. But not all hope is lost for climate change policy, with the pledges made in Copenhagen far stronger than the media has represented, writes <b>Ross Gittins</b>.

Gittens: Copenhagen wasn’t a failure

Like Australia, the US has just abandoned plans for an emissions trading scheme. But not all hope is lost for climate change policy, with the pledges made in Copenhagen far stronger than the media has represented, writes Ross Gittins.

The UN climate conference meeting in the Mexican resort town of Cancun at the end of the month promises to be a far less dramatic circus than the Copenhagen conference at the end of last year, writes <b>Georgina Woods</b>, director, Climate Action Network Australia.

Please ignore the UN climate deal

The UN climate conference meeting in the Mexican resort town of Cancun at the end of the month promises to be a far less dramatic circus than the Copenhagen conference at the end of last year, writes Georgina Woods, director, Climate Action Network Australia.

The climate negotiations came to a close last week in China and the closing plenary of the talks was not without drama. Delayed for over an hour, head negotiators huddled around the hall desperately seeking common ground, reports <b>Phillip Ireland</b>.

Was this Copenhagen all over again?

The climate negotiations came to a close last week in China and the closing plenary of the talks was not without drama. Delayed for over an hour, head negotiators huddled around the hall desperately seeking common ground, reports Phillip Ireland.

Suring the Copenhagen summit last year there was a very clever service available for journos, where 650 climate scientists offered up their brains for the picking on tricky science questions. The service is back. What questions would you want answered? asks <b>Amber Jamieson</b>.

What would you ask a climate scientist?

Suring the Copenhagen summit last year there was a very clever service available for journos, where 650 climate scientists offered up their brains for the picking on tricky science questions. The service is back. What questions would you want answered? asks Amber Jamieson.

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