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Topic: book reviews
Book review: <em>Questions of Travel</em> — first class writing

Book review: Questions of Travel — first class writing

Michelle de Kretser's novel Questions of Travel has picked up two of Australia's most prestigious literary prizes. It mines our political and personal dilemmas splendidly, writes James Waite Morgan.

Trying and failing at Febfast: on Jill Stark’s <em>High Sobriety</em>

Trying and failing at Febfast: on Jill Stark’s High Sobriety

After failing at Febfast, Stephanie Van Schilt decided -- after reading Jill Stark's High Society -- that she was all out of excuses. Van Schilt describes Stark's book and her relationship with "the demon drink."

The net sucks, social media is bullshit: two new books on the ‘internet delusion’

The net sucks, social media is bullshit: two new books on the ‘internet delusion’

Two new books explore the notion that the internet isn’t the commercial or democratic force it’s touted to be. Are they worth your time? James Rose gives his verdict.

Book review: Ron Rash’s <em>Nothing Gold Can Stay</em>

Book review: Ron Rash’s Nothing Gold Can Stay

Set exclusively in the Carolinas, Ron Rash's thrilling collection of short stories show us people for whom all hope has been vanquished, writes Paul Donoughe.

Book review: <em>The Burial</em>, by Courtney Collins

Book review: The Burial, by Courtney Collins

Courtney Collins' fictional tale about Australia’s last bushranger is told through the dead eyes of Jessie’s newborn child. It's a beautiful book but lacks depth and is tonally inconsistent, writes Erin Handley.

When clickbait turned serious: defending <em>Love in the Time of Cholera</em>

When clickbait turned serious: defending Love in the Time of Cholera

An Age op-ed slamming Gabrielle García Márquez’s classic novel Love in the Time of Cholera seemed like harmless clickbait, but the Victoria Curriculum Assessment Authority took it seriously. Bethanie Blanchard defends a beautiful and intricate novel.

Book review: Zadie Smith’s <em>NW</em> — crossing boundaries and capturing voices

Book review: Zadie Smith’s NW — crossing boundaries and capturing voices

Fragmented, dizzying, nerve-jangling and sometimes frustrating, there are nevertheless flashes of brilliance in Zadie Smith's NW, writes Bethanie Blanchard.

Of luck and love: Gillian Mears’ <em>Foal’s Bread</em>

Of luck and love: Gillian Mears’ Foal’s Bread

It is a talisman of luck, and love. Foal’s bread -- both the object and Gillian Mears' new novel -- is a strange, rare and mesmerising thing. Bethanie Blanchard says it shines through sadness.

Money <em>can</em> buy you love: Martin Amis’s <em>Lionel Asbo</em>

Money can buy you love: Martin Amis’s Lionel Asbo

Forget all those stories about how material possessions can't make you happy. Lionel Asbo is a novel about a vindictive anti-hero who is made immensely happy by money, writes Lucas Smith.

Antony Loewenstein and Jeff Sparrow’s <em>Left Turn</em>

Antony Loewenstein and Jeff Sparrow’s Left Turn

Post-apocalyptic fiction in many ways mirrors current pessimism. This is one of many paths explored in New Left, a collection of political essays related to a resurgent brand of leftish thinking, writes Adam Brereton.