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Topic: bill of rights
(Image: AAP/Lukas Coch)

2019: a failed system leaves citizens bereft

2019 showed that we should focus more on a political system that is failing Australians than on the individual personalities that populate our parliaments.

Why a bill of rights is still a long way off

Crikey readers discuss the prospect of a national bill of rights, AFP raids and the mentality propping up refugee detention camps.

Australia lags behind the rest of the world on a bill of rights

Recent incursions on Australia's free press have shown once again that, without a national bill of rights, liberty is treated cheaply in Australia.

John Lyons (left), executive editor of ABC News, is followed by an AFP officer. (Image: AAP/David Gray)

Media raids prove that Australia needs a conservative bill of rights

Complaining about police raids on media outlets will achieve nothing. Australia needs a structural mechanism to curb governments and protect citizens and institutions from them.

Image credit: Chris Pavlich/AAP

Morrison tries, fails to court the popular vote with CIC

Crikey readers discuss the government's proposed anti-corruption body and the Ruddock review into religious freedom.

Could religious extremists pave the way for a bill of rights?

The push for legislative protection of religious freedom could be a way to achieve a bill of rights that Australia so desperately needs.

Politicians’ contempt for liberties shows need for bill of rights

Our political system is failing to protect our basic rights. A different approach is needed, one that doesn't rely on hacks like Daniel Andrews.

Libertarian and physicist <b>Peter Rohde</b> explains why enshrining a Bill of Rights into Australia's constitution would be a dangerous move, shifting power from elected representatives to an unpredictable and unaccountable judiciary.

Against an Australian Bill of Rights

Libertarian and physicist Peter Rohde explains why enshrining a Bill of Rights into Australia's constitution would be a dangerous move, shifting power from elected representatives to an unpredictable and unaccountable judiciary.

Emotional, fear-mongering and ill-informed comments about a human rights charter do not make for robust, reasoned, logical debate, writes <b>Mark Blumer</b>.

Human rights: why we need a charter

Emotional, fear-mongering and ill-informed comments about a human rights charter do not make for robust, reasoned, logical debate, writes Mark Blumer.

Is the government backing away from introducing a bill of rights? In the absence of any serious negatives, we should expect a human rights act within this parliamentary term, writes <b>Susan Ryan</b>, chair of the Australian Human Rights Group.

Human rights: what is Rudd waiting for?

Is the government backing away from introducing a bill of rights? In the absence of any serious negatives, we should expect a human rights act within this parliamentary term, writes Susan Ryan, chair of the Australian Human Rights Group.