Crikey copy style guide

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y

AGES | APOSTROPHES | BYLINES | COLONS | CAPITALISATION / TITLES | CENSORED WORDS (EMAIL) | CURRENCY | DATES | DISCLOSURE LINE| DOT POINTS | ELLIPSIS | EXCERPTS | FIGURES | FILM TITLES | FOREIGN WORDS | HONORIFICS | HTML | HYPHENS | IMAGE SIZES | LEGISLATION | MARKET PERCENTAGE POINTS | PARENTHESES | PERCENTAGES | PICTURES |  PUBLICATION TITLES | PUBLISHED FIRST AT | PUNCTUATION IN QUOTES | QUOTING / TENSE | SONG TITLES | SPACING | STATES / TERRITORIES | TEMPERATURE | TIMES | TRUNCATING STORIES (EMAIL) | TV SHOW TITLES | WEBSITE TITLES

Remember the Golden Rule: if in doubt, defer to the Macquarie Dictionary.

#

2Day FM

21st century (“century” in lower case)

60 Minutes (not “Sixty Minutes“)

7.30 (TV show)

7-Eleven

9/11 (terrorist attack)


A

ABC (never “Australian Broadcasting Corporation”)

ABC (channel) (not “ABC1”)

ABC Comedy

ABC Radio

ABC News

ABC News 24

Aboriginal (only use as an adjective, never as a noun. Never “Aborigine”)

about (avoid “approximately” or “around”)

ACT (avoid “Australian Capital Territory”)

act (lower case if not the full name of legislation; capped and italicised if full name is used, e.g. Racial Discrimination Act 1975)

acting Prime Minister Jane Smith (when specific and current. Always lower case “acting”.)

acting Premier Joe Smith (when specific and current)

acting Minister for Defence Jane Smith (when specific and current)

The Advertiser (no “Adelaide”)

adviser (not “advisor”)

affect (to influence, move, touch, produce an effect on)

AFL (never “Australian Football League”)

The Age

air-conditioning

airstrike

aka (for “also known as”. Not AKA, a.k.a, A.K.A)

Al Jazeera

Allahu Akbar

ALP (don’t spell out; “Labor Party” preferred)

al-Qaeda

alt-right

aluminium

ambassador (never “Ambassador”)

amid (never “amidst”)

analogue (not “analog”)

antagonise (not “antagonize”)

anthologise (not “anthologize”)fp

Antifa

anti-Semitism

anti-vax (single x for the conspiracy)

anti-vaxxer (double x for a proponent of the conspiracy)

any more

Anzac (not “ANZAC”)

arch rival (not “arch-rival”)

Asia-Pacific (not “Asia Pacific”)

Asian century, the

Assistant Minister for Defence Jane Smith (upper case ‘Assistant’)

assistant professor (Note: Professor alone is capitalised)

Attorney-General (when current, see section on Honorifics)

attorneys-general (plural)

AG when abbreviating attorney-general (not “A-G”)

Auditor-General (when current, see section on Honorifics)

auditor-general

AUSTRAC (not Austrac)

The Australian (shorter: “the Oz“)

The Australian Financial Review (shorter: “the Fin” or “the AFR“)

Australian Army (otherwise “army”)

Australian Air Force (otherwise “air force”)

Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics (then “ABARE”)

Australian Communications and Media Authority (then “ACMA”)

Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (then “ACCC”)

Australian Council of Trade Unions (then “ACTU”)

Australian Customs Service (then “customs”)

Australian Defence Force (then “defence force”)

Australian Navy (then “navy”)

Australian Public Service (otherwise “public service”)

Australian Securities and Investments Commission (then “ASIC”)

Australian Shareholders’ Association (then “ASA”)

Australian Taxation Office (then “ATO” or “tax office”)

Australian Workers’ Union (then “AWU”)

AWOL

The Australian Women’s Weekly (shorter: “AWW“)


AGES

20-year-old Joe Smith …

Joe Smith, 20, said …

Joe Smith is 20 years old.

Joe Smith is in his 20s.


APOSTROPHES

’90s (not “90’s”)

News’ AGM (after the “s”, no second “s”)

ALBUM TITLES

Thriller (italics)


B

baby boomer

backbench, backbencher

backburner

back-to-back (as an adjective phrase)

bailout

barbecue (not “BBQ” or “barbeque”)

basket case

bated breath (not “baited breath”)

bean-counters

behaviour (not “behavior”)

beleaguered

benefited

benefiting

Beyond Blue

biannual (happens twice a year)

Bible, the (the book)

bible (as in “the Hollywood bible”)

biblical (not “Biblical”)

biennial (happens every two years)

big four (as in banks)

bigwig

bill (unless the full name of a legislative bill)

bipartisan

Black (capitalised when referring to race)

blokeyness

blowjob

blowout

boardroom

branch stacking (not “branch-stacking”)

BRW (never “Business Review Weekly“)

bureaux (never “bureaus”)

burnout

burqa (not “burka”)

bushfire

buyback

byelection (not “by-election”)


BYLINES

Joe Smith (not “by Joe Smith”)


C

cabinet (never “Cabinet”)

cabinet secretary

The Cairns Post

capitalise (not “capitalize”)

carbon pollution reduction scheme (then “CPRS”)

car park (not carpark)

Catholic

caucus (never “Caucus”)

census (not “Census”)

Central America

central Australia (never “Central Australia”)

centre

Centrelink (not “CentreLink”)

chairman (never “Chairman”)

chairwoman (never “Chairwoman”)

checkout

Chief Commissioner (when specific and current)

chief of staff

childcare

church (only cap up for the Catholic Church, if “the church” leave capped down)

CityLink

City of Sydney

Civil Aviation Safety Authority (then “CASA”)

clickbait

Closing The Gap

Co (for companies, no full stop)

Coalition (when the official political Coalition)

Coca-Cola

cognisance (not “cognizance”)

Coke

comedian (never comedienne)

commercialise (not “commercialize”)

commissioner (e.g. sex discrimination commissioner Kate Jenkins, royal commissioner Kenneth Hayne)

committees — official parliamentary committees codified in law are capped up

Commonwealth

Communist (when from the Communist Party)

communist

Congress (for US Congress)

constitution

cookbook

cooperate/cooperation (recently updated from previous “co-operate”)

coordinate/coordination (recently updated from previous “co-ordinate”)

coordinator (recently updated from previous “co-ordinator”)

coronavirus

coroner

Coroner’s Court

council

councillor (or “Cr”)

The Courier-Mail (with hyphen)

counter-terrorism

COVID-19 (upper case). “COVID” also acceptable. Capitalise the names of variants e.g. “Delta variant”

craftsman

craftswoman

Crikey

cringe-worthy

criticise (not “criticize”)

crossbench

crossbencher

cross-section

crowdfunding

crowdsource

Crown (when “Crown land” or “Crown prosecutor”)

Crown Casino

cul-de-sac

Cup (when “Melbourne Cup” etc)

curb (to restrain)

Customs (when Australian Customs Service)

customs check

customs officer

cutback

cutout

cybersecurity


COLONS

Don’t use a capital after a colon: in a regular sentence.

Use a capital: “When it’s a quote.”

Use a capital when it’s in an explainer list or series of dot points, e.g:

  • What it means: That the first word after a colon should be capped like this.
  • What the experts say: It should.

On colons in headlines:

Use a capital after a colon in a headline if it is in “label-style” or part of an ongoing or special series (e.g. “Virus Watch: The return of Donald Trump”; “Tips and Murmurs: Another return of Donald Trump”; “The Great Rort: Bing bong”).

Don’t use a capital after a colon in a headline if it is more phrasal, not a series or not in “label-style” (e.g. “Horror at the waterfront: big shark spotted!”; “A very dismal year: charting Scott Morrison’s 2020”).

COMPANY AND ORGANISATION NAME STYLE

Where possible, style the title of a company/organisation as the company itself styles it, even if it contradicts house style.

For example: World Health Organization (not “Organisation”); Centers of Disease Control (not “Centres”); National COVID-19 Coordination Commission (not “Co-ordination”).

CONTENT WARNINGS

Note: this article mentions xyz (e.g. sexaul assault, domestic violence)


CAPITALISATION / TITLES

Auditor-General Jane Smith (when current and specific)

auditor-general Jane Smith (when not current)

Chief Commissioner Jane Smith (when specific and current)

Commonwealth

Deputy Opposition Leader Jane Smith (when specific and current)

Deputy Premier Jane Smith (when specific and current)

Deputy Prime Minister Jane Smith (when specific and current)

Deputy Speaker Jane Smith (when specific and current)

Director-General Joe Smith (when specific and current)

federal government (never “Federal Government”)

government (never “Government”)

Governor-General Jane Smith (when specific and current)

Governor Jane Smith (when specific and current)

Reserve Bank/RBA governor (never “Governor”)

local government (never “Local Government”)

local council (never “Local Council”)

Minister (when specific and current)

ministers

Opposition Leader Jane Smith (when specific and current)

opposition leader Jane Smith (when not current)

Parliament

parliamentary secretary Jane Smith

Parliament House

Prime Minister Jane Smith (when specific and current)

prime minister Jane Smith (when not current)

prime ministers

Speaker Jane Smith (when specific and current)

state government (never “State Government”)

Treasurer Jane Smith (when specific and current)

treasurer Jane Smith (when not current)

treasurers (when plural)


CURRENCY

$1, $2, $3 (always a numeral)

$1b (in headlines)

$1k (in headlines)

$1m (in headlines)

A$1 (not $A1)

50 cents (not 50c)


D

dad (never “Dad”)

Daesh (not “Da’ish”), another name for Islamic State

Daily Review (not “The Daily Review“)

The Daily Telegraph

dance floor

data (use in the singular preferred over plural; e.g. “the data shows this”)

deadlock

decriminalise (not “decriminalize”)

de facto

Defence Force (when the Australian Defence Force, US Defence Force, etc)

Democratic Party (US)

dependant (noun)

dependent (adjective)

Deputy Opposition Leader (when current and specific)

Deputy Speaker (when current and specific)

deregister

desensitise (not “desensitize”)

desk-bound

dialogue

diarrhoea

Digger

Direct Action (Coalition policy)

Director-General (when specific and current)

director-general

Director of Public Prosecutions

dispatch

dog-whistle, dog-whistling

dole bludger

doorknocking

Dorothy Dixer

dot.com

doughnut

Down Under

downsizing

Dr Smith (not “Doctor Smith”)

drink-driving


DATES

1990s (no apostrophe)

’90s

January 1 (not “1 January” or “January 1st”)

January 1, 2000


DISCLOSURE LINE / DISCLAIMER

In italics (e.g. Private Media, the parent company of Crikey, received JobKeeper last year. None of the funds were paid to shareholders as dividends. It was used entirely to pay staff salaries.

When publishing an article by a current politician, including the following line at the end: Crikey accepts submissions from all sides of politics which are in keeping with our editorial standards.

DOT POINTS / LISTS

Cap up each line, but no punctuation at the end of each line, just finish the series with a full stop. E.g.

  • Line 1 of text
  • Line 2 of text
  • Line 3 of text.


E

-elect (as in “Prime Minister-elect”)

earrings

East Asia (see place names)

Eastern Europe (see place names)

Easter

Ebola (capped)

e-book

effect (to bring about, accomplish, cause to exist or happen)

e.g.

electoral college

email

emigrant (leaves a country)

en masse

enter

editor-in-chief

Environment Protection Authority (then “EPA”)

Eskimo

espresso (never “expresso”)

e-tag

etc (not “etc.”)

euro (when money)

eurozone (not “Eurozone”)

European Union (“EU”)

expat (not “ex-pat”)


ELLIPSIS

To indicate … omitted words in a quote (word[space]…[space]word)

Including at the end of a sentence …

Unless indicating a dramatic trailing-off… (word[no space]…)

Tips headline format: Big Scotty does it again … Shark Watch … (word[space]…[space]word)


EXCERPTS

  • Between 25-30 words
  • Must be different to the lede of the story
  • Include HTML where necessary
  • Include author’s name — “… writes <b>Joe Smith</b>.” — and their title/position/expertise when “Crikey” is selected as author

F

F-111

F-word

far north Queensland (never “Far North Queensland”)

far right (“far-right” as an adjective, e.g. “far-right columnist”)

fast-tracked

Father’s Day

FBI (never “Federal Bureau of Investigations”)

fear mongering (but “scaremongering” and “warmongering”)

federal (never “Federal”)

Federal Court

federal government (never “Federal Government”)

Federal Magistrates Court (not “Federal Magistrate’s Court”)

Federation (when referring to the event in 1901)

filmmaker

Financial Times (UK; no “The”)

firearms

firefighter

fire sale

first-hand (as in “first-hand knowledge”)

First Nations

First Peoples

First World

flyer, in all cases

focus, focused, focusing

foetus

footy

Four Corners (not “4 Corners“)

Four’n Twenty

Fox News

Fox Sports

Foxtel

Four Corners (not “4 Corners“)

four-wheel-drive (then “4WD”)

freedom of information (then “FOI”)

free-for-all

free-to-air (TV)

freewheeling

frequent-flyer

fringe benefits tax (not “benefit”)

frontbench, frontbencher

front line (noun)

frontline (adjective, as in “frontline worker”, “frontline combat”. Updated from previously used “front-line”)

frontrunner

fundraising

furore


FIGURES

one, two, three … nine (not 1, 2, 3)

10, 11, 12 … 9999 (not ten, eleven, twelve)

10,000, 10,001, 10,002 … 99,999 (with a comma)

100,000, 100,001, 100,002 … 999,999 (with a comma)

1 million, 2 million, 3 million (always with a numeral)

Pluralised numbers should be spelled out (tens, not “10s”; tens of millions, not of “10s of 1,000,000s”).

All numbers as figures in headlines and subheads (including 1, 2, 3)

Numbers at the beginning of a sentence should always be spelled out (“Fifty-five people died” not “55 people died”.)

Half a million, half a billion (no hyphens)


FILM TITLES

Gone with the Wind (italics)


FOREIGN WORDS

ménage à trois (italics)


G

Gaddafi, Muammar

gatekeeper

Geelong Advertiser (no “The”)

gen X, gen Y

GetUp

glamorous

global financial crisis (no caps)

gobsmacked

God (when specific)

god/s (when describing a god within a polytheistic pantheon; when plural)

Gold Coast Bulletin (no “The”)

gold medal

goldmine

goodwill

Google

Google+

google as a verb (as in, “I googled him”)

government (never “Government”)

governors-general (plural)

grand final

grand prix (except “Australian Grand Prix”)

grandstand

grassroots

Great Depression

green paper (not “Green Paper”)

Greens, the (political party)

great-grandfather

Grim Reaper

ground zero

Ground Zero (in reference to 9/11)

groupthink (not “group-think”)

Guardian Australia (for the Australian version of The Guardian)


H

half-a-dozen

hangout (not hang-out)

harbour

harbour city (as in Sydney)

hardline

headstart

healthcare (but “mental health care”)

hell-bent

helipad

Herald Sun (no “The”; no hyphen)

High Court

high tech (or “high-tech” as adjective)

Hongkonger (resident of Hong Kong. Preferred over Hongkongese. Never “Hong Konger”)

House of Representatives

Sunday Herald Sun

HELPLINES

Child abuse: Survivors of abuse can find support by calling Bravehearts at 1800 272 831 or the Blue Knot Foundation at 1300 657 380. The Kids Helpline is 1800 55 1800. In an emergency, call 000. 

Sexual assault or domestic/family violence: If you or someone you know is affected by sexual assault or violence, call 1800RESPECT on 1800 737 732 or visit 1800RESPECT.org.au. In an emergency, call 000.

For counselling, advice and support for men in NSW, Victoria and Tasmania who have anger, relationship or parenting issues, call the Men’s Referral Service on 1300 766 491. Men in WA can contact the Men’s Domestic Violence Helpline on 1800 000 599.

(Note for reporters/sub-editors: For a story where you feel local services would be more appropriate — for example a story covering family violence where the victim is a First Nations person — you can find a service in the local area by searching here: https://www.1800respect.org.au/services.)

Suicide, depression or mental illness: For anyone seeking help, Lifeline is on 13 11 14 and Beyond Blue is on 1300 22 4636. In an emergency, call 000. 

Problem gambling: Anybody affected by gambling (your own gambling or someone else’s), can call Gambler’s Help on 1800 858 858.

HONORIFICS

Never use general honorifics like Mr/Mrs/Ms etc.

Honorifics should only be capitalised when immediately preceding the name of a person who currently holds that title. For example, “Prime Minister Scott Morrison wears glasses”.

For people who no longer hold the title, the honorific should be lower case. For example, “Former prime minister Kevin Rudd also wears glasses”.

Honorifics should always be lower case if they do not immediately precede a name. “The prime minister wears glasses.”

Opposition spokesman, spokeswoman or spokesperson is always lower case, even when current. E.g. opposition spokesperson for foreign affairs Penny Wong. We don’t use the term “shadow minister”.

When refering to someone who was in a position at the time, use “then-” with a hyphen. For example “then-prime minister Kevin Rudd” not “then prime minister Kevin Rudd”.

Hereafter, a list of common honorifics (by no means exhaustive):

Dr (doctor)

Governor

Governor-General

Lieutenant-General

Minister

Prime Minister

President

Professor (note: “assistant professor”, “associate professor” etc are not capitalised)

Professor emeritus (not “Emeritus”)

Sergeant


HTML

<a href=”URL”>These words linked</a>

<a href=”URL” target=”_blank”>These words linked and opening in a new tab/browser</a>

<blockquote class=”green_quote”>”For pull-out quotes in stories.”</blockquote>

<b>bold</b>

<center>aligned centre</center>

<em>emphasis</em>


HYPHENS

Use an em dash as a break (two “-” in WordPress) for parenthetical information or for a sentence joiner. Ensure there is a space before and after the dash.

Use a small dash (-) for compound words and adjective phrases.

Refer to The Chicago Manual of Style for a more thorough explanation.


I

IBISworld

i.e. (not “ie”)

iPad

iPhone

Immigration Department

immigrant (enters a country)

Indigenous

independent MP

instalment

instil

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (then “IPCC”)

internet

Inq

Iraq War

IS (not “ISIL”, but say “also called ISIS” or similar to avoid confusion. No definite article. As with all acronyms, spell out at first reference)

IMAGE CREDITS

(Image: [outlet name]/[photographer])


J

jail (never “gaol”)

Jew

Jewish

Jr (for junior)

judgment (not “judgement”)

justice of the peace


K

kerb (pavement edge)

kilometres (when being used generally), km when immediately following a numeral (e.g. 10km)

Kim Jong-il

Kim Jong-un

Kmart

KO

KO’d (prefer “knocked out”)

Koran, not Qur’an

Ku Klux Klan


L

Labor Party

landscape

leader (as in Greens leader)

left (in all cases)

leftie (a left-wing or left-handed person)

lewd

LGBTIQ

Liberal-National Party (then “LNP”)

Liberal Party

lifelong

likeable

line-up

LinkedIn

live blog

live-streamed

live streaming

local government (never “Local Government”)

local council (never “Local Council”)

lockdown

the Lodge

long-form (as in “long-form data”)

long-standing (as in “long-standing minister”)

lower house


LEGISLATION

Crimes Act (italics; lower case “act” in further references)


M

Magistrates Court (not “Magistrate’s Court”)

make-up (not “makeup”)

marginalise (not “marginalize”)

MasterCard

MasterChef (TV show)

McDonald’s

Me Too (not “#MeToo”, unless referring specifically to the hashtag)

media (usage can be employed in the singular or the plural. See Macquarie Dictionary ruling.)

mediaeval

medivac

ménage à trois (italics)

mic (as in microphone)

micro-party

mid-strength

Mid-Year Economic and Fiscal Outlook (then “MYEFO”)

Middle East

Midwinter Ball

Millennial (the person)

ministers

Minister, the (when specific and current)

mobilise (not “mobilize”)

Mother’s Day

multibillion (not “multi-billion”)

multibillion-dollar

multichannel (not “multi-channel”)

multimillion (not “multi-million”)

multimillion-dollar

mum (never “Mum”)

Myanmar (not “Burma”)


MARKET PERCENTAGE POINTS

up/down 6 (always numeral)

NAMES

No full stop after middle initials (Ulysses S Grant not Ulysses S. Grant)


N

national broadband network (then “NBN”)

national energy guarantee (then “NEG”)

national executive (not “National Executive”) of a political party

National Party

neck-and-neck

neighbour (not “neighbor”)

neighbourhood

neocon

neoconservative (not “neo-conservative”)

neoliberal

neo-Nazi

new-found

News Corp

News Limited no longer exists. It is News Corp Australia. News Corp is fine (as in “News Corp papers …”, unless the story also mentions 21st Century Fox or News Corp UK & Ireland Limited (formerly News International)

News of the World (then “NotW“)

New South Wales (then “NSW”)

New World, Old World (as in, “New World wines/monkeys, etc”)

The New York Times (with “The)

night-time

Nine Network (not “9 Network”)

No. 1, No. 2, etc (not “number one”, “number two” …)

nondescript

no one

Northern Territory (then “NT”)

not-for-profit

NT News (no “The”)


O

OK (not “ok” or “okay”)

op-ed

opposition (not “Opposition” in politics)

Opposition Leader (when specific/current)

opposition leader (when not current)

opposition leaders

ongoing

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (then “OECD”)

Organisation of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (then “OPEC”)

organisations (not “organizations”)

Osama bin Laden

overestimate

overhang

overperform

overreach

over-reported

oversold

oversupply

overweight

outdated


P

paedophile

Page numbers should be numerals (e.g. “Page 3 of the Tele features …)

passé (italics)

Parliament

parliamentary secretary

Parliament House

parliaments

partyroom (not “party room” or “party-room”)

patronising (not “patronizing”)

payday

pay TV (not “pay-TV”)

paywall

peacekeeper

peacekeeping

The People’s Daily (China newspaper)

personalise (not “personalize”)

phone-hacking

phoney (not “phony”)

photoshopping

pill-testing

Podcast titles italicised (This American Life), individual episode titles “in quotation marks”.

policymaker (but decision-maker)

pork-barrel (not porkbarrel or pork barrel)

pork-barrelling

powerbroker

pounds (British) – the symbol does not translate into the newsletter, so write out “pounds” until resolved

preconceived

pre-empted

preselection

President (when specific/current)

president (when not current)

president-elect (never “President-elect”)

press gallery (always lower case)

price fixing (not “price-fixing”)

prime minister (when not current)

Prime Minister (when specific and current)

Prime Minister’s Office (capitalised when referring to the department, then “PMO”)

prime ministers (when plural)

program (never “programme”)

protester (not “protestor”)

Pty Ltd (but generally not required)

public-private partnership

public service

public servants


PARENTHESES

Use (round parentheses) in all cases except within quotes.

“Use [square parentheses] when adding context to quotes.”


PERCENTAGES

1% (always use the numeral and percentage sign)

One per cent (when starting a sentence)

PICTURES

Feature images: 740×400 (some flexibility on the depth, but keep the width at 740)

Homepage image: 1200x800px

Screengrabs of social media: no wider than 500px. Make sure anything that identifies you is blurred out.

Inline images in the newsletter that are documents or not social media should be 555px, or wider if necessary to be legible. All images in the newsletter should be no wider than 600px

PLACE NAMES

Recognised global regions should be capped if popular convention supports it (e.g. Central America, Eastern Europe, South-East Asia, Oceania). This does not include locally-recognised or non-official regions (northern Queensland, western Sydney, central Australia, etc)


PUBLICATION TITLES

The Sydney Morning Herald (capitalise “The” when done in the masthead; italics)

news.com.au (no capital “N”, no italics)

The names/titles of individual articles in a publication, if referenced, should be in “Double quote marks” and sentence case.

Crikey products and newsletter names are italicised in full. E.g WormWeekenderSideviewCrikey TalksCrikey Inside Access.


PUBLISHED FIRST AT

This article first appeared at XXXX and is republished with permission. (Italics, except for publication name with link. Should appear at the top of the article)


PUNCTUATION IN QUOTES

“Punctuation inside the quote when a complete sentence.”

Punctuation “outside the quote when not a complete sentence”.

“Use ‘single quote marks’ when inside a quote.”


Q

Q+A (not QandA, Q&A, qanda)

Qantas (not “QANTAS”)

Queensland (only “Qld” in headlines)

question time

QUOTATION MARKS

Always use single quotation marks within headlines, subheads and excerpts.


QUOTING / TENSE 

<blockquote class=”green_quote”>”For pull-out quotes in stories.”</blockquote>

Joe Smith said: “This is the quote.” (capital at the start; don’t attribute the quote at the end)

“Punctuation inside the quote when a complete sentence.”

Punctuation “outside the quote when not a complete sentence”.

“Use [square parentheses] when adding context to quotes.”

“Use past tense when a complete quote,” he said.

Use present tense when paraphrasing, he says.

Use present tense “when quoting a phrase”, he says.

“Use ‘single quote marks’ inside quotes.”

Use single quote marks if the quote being attributed has been invented by the author (i.e. not literally being attributed to the speaker; usually ironic)


R

rank-and-file

realise (not “realize”)

real-time (when attached to another word)

reelected (not “re-elected)

reelection (not “re-election”)

reimagine

reinvent

renewable energy target (then “RET”)

rent-seeking

Republican Party (US)

reopen, reopening (not “re-open, re-opening”)

repurposed

report (lower case, unless named in full. For example: the Brereton report, but The Inspector-General of the Australian Defence Force Afghanistan Inquiry Report. Same rule as with royal commissions, see below)

rewrite

Rich Lister (only when BRW Rich List, otherwise “rich lister”)

right (in all cases)

right-hand man

roadkill

roadshow (not “road-show”)

roadside

robodebt (updated from previously used “robo-debt”)

Rohingya

rollout

round-the-clock

royal commission (unless specific, e.g. “Victorian Bushfire Royal Commission”)

royal family

royals


S

The Saturday Age

same-sex

sceptic (not “skeptic”)

schoolboy

schoolgirl

Scotty from marketing (lower case “f” and “m”)

second-hand (as in “second-hand bike”)

secretary (as in “parliamentary secretary”; lower case)

section (of a law, a code, act, etc); lower case

Senate

Senator (when specific and current)

Senate estimates (lower case “e” in estimates)

Seven Network (not “7 Network”)

shakeout (not “shake-out”)

shake-up (not “shakeup”)

shareholder (not “share-holder”)

sharemarket (not “stockmarket”)

sharia law

sheikh

Shiite (not “Shi’ite”)

shootout

sideline

sidelining

Slater & Gordon

SmartCompany

South-East Asia (see place names)

Speaker (when a current Speaker in Parliament)

speaker (when a former speaker in Parliament)

spend (not a noun)

spreadsheet

Sr. (for senior)

stadiums (not “stadia”)

stakeholder (not “stake-holder”)

standalone

standoff

standout

start-up (as in “a start-up company”)

StartUp Smart

state government (not State Government)

Stolen Generations

streetside

stylised (not “stylized”)

subeditor

subprime (not “sub-prime”)

South Australia (then “SA”)

southern hemisphere

The Sunday Age

Sunday Mail (no “The”)

The Sunday Telegraph (shorter: “Sunday Tele“)

Sunday Territorian

The Sun-Herald

Super PAC

Super PACs (plural)

superstar

super-yacht

switchover (as in “digital switchover”)

The Sydney Morning Herald (shorter: “The SMH“)


SONG TITLES

“Thriller” (quotation marks)


SPACING

A single space between everything — remove all double spacing


STATES / TERRITORIES

ACT (never “Australian Capital Territory”)

New South Wales (then “NSW”)

Northern Territory (then “NT”)

South Australia (then “SA”)

Queensland (only “Qld” in headlines)

Tasmania (only “Tas” or “Tassie” in headlines)

Victoria (only “Vic” in headlines)

Western Australia (then “WA”)


T

takeover (noun)

talkback (as in radio)

taskforce

Tasmania (only “Tas” or “Tassie” in headlines)

Tax Office

Ten Network (not “10 Network”)

tens (never “10s”. See note on Figures)

terrorised (not “terrorized”)

Test cricket

The Daily Telegraph (shorter “the Tele”)

then-prime minister, then-governor, etc (hyphen after then)

think piece

think tank

Third World

timeline

Timor-Leste (not East Timor)

tonne (never “ton”)

Tooheys (not “Toohey’s”)

Top End, the

Torres Straight Islander

trademark

train wreck

traumatise (not “traumatize”)

travelled

traveller

Treasurer (when specific and current)

treasurer (when not current)

treasurers (when plural)

Treasury (when the government department)

Treaties (names of treaties never italicised)

trillion (a million million, or a thousand billion; convert to billions where possible)

triple A (not “Triple A”)

triple j (not Triple J, with apologies to Emily Watkins)

troublemaker

tsar (not “czar”)

T-shirt (not “t-shirt”)

turnaround (not “turn-around”)

turnoff (not “turn-off”)

tweet

Twitter (capitalised)

two-party preferred (then “2PP”)


TEMPERATURE

1 degree (no “celsius”)

-1 degree


TIMES

12pm (no space)

12.01pm (stop, not colon)


TRUNCATING STORIES (EMAIL)

  • Stories should be truncated in the email where the length is roughly 1200 words or more.
  • Truncate stories after 600-800
  • Ensure there is a space before and after the truncate mark


TV SHOW TITLES

I Love Lucy (italics)


U

Uyghur

unAustralian

underestimate

underperform

undervalued

underweight

upper house

up-and-coming

US$ (not $US)

use-by date


V

V8 Supercars

value-add

veranda

use v for versus, not vs (e.g. Alien v Predator)

Vice-President (current and specific)

vice-president (when not current)

vice-presidents (when plural)

Victoria (only “Vic” in headlines)

video game, video gaming

video-on-demand

Vodafone (not “Vodaphone”)

voicemail


W

Walmart

War on Terror

The Washington Post

weekend

The Weekend Australian (then “Weekend Oz“)

well-being

The West Australian (then “the West”)

Western Australia (then “WA”)

Western culture

the West (as in “we here in the West”)

western hemisphere

whinge, whingeing

whistleblower

white paper (not “White Paper”)

White Australia Policy

the White House

wicketkeeper (then “keeper”)

wi-fi (not “Wi-Fi”)

wind farm

wine varities — all lower case, including burgandy, champagne, etc.

wish list

witch-hunt

WorkChoices

workload

World War II

worldwide

write-down

wrongdoing


WEBSITE TITLES

The Daily Beast (italicise online publications only — not business sites, search engines etc.)


X

X-ray


Y

Yahoo

year-on-year

Year 1, Year 2… Year 11, Year 21 (capital Y; not “Grade”)

Yes campaign, No campaign (for the plebiscite), but vote yes, vote no

YouTube