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Justine Landis-Hanley — Reporter

Justine Landis-Hanley

Reporter

Justine has just completed a media and philosophy degree at the University of Sydney. Her work has been published in The New York Times, The Saturday Paper and The Age. She has worked as a casual reporter for The Sydney Morning Herald, an international fellow to the Agence-France Presse Tokyo bureau, editor of student newspaper Honi Soit, and was The New York Times Australia bureau’s first reporting intern. Justine is passionate about gender equality, and has undertaken public policy research work and fellowships with the G20, the Australian Human Rights Commission, and the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women.

Is Lawyer X's lost 'libido' really in the public interest?

Is Lawyer X's lost 'libido' really in the public interest?

The Age's latest story about the Nicola Gobbo saga raises questions about responsible reporting on mental health.

Is it really that hard for chefs to pay minimum wage?

Is it really that hard for chefs to pay minimum wage?

Celebrity chefs are calling for an amnesty for employers who underpay their workers, insisting the Australia's labour laws are too complicated to follow. But the experts Crikey spoke to say it's not that hard.

2GB boss can't take his own medicine

2GB boss can't take his own medicine

Macquarie Media has spent millions on defamation payouts courtesy of its stable of shock jocks. But now CEO Adam Lang finds himself in the plaintiff's chair.

Why did the government declare war on the AAT? To uphold 'community standards'

Why did the government declare war on the AAT? To uphold 'community standards'

The government justifies its reshaping of the Administrative Appeals Tribunal by claiming it brings it into line with 'community standards'. For some seeking the tribunal's judgement, the changes could mean life or death.

How Tony Abbott made sure the AAT would never come under scrutiny

How Tony Abbott made sure the AAT would never come under scrutiny

Appointments to the Administrative Appeals Tribunal were once subject to review via a separate council... until the Abbott government gutted it.

How Liberal staffers, candidates and MPs arrived at the AAT

How Liberal staffers, candidates and MPs arrived at the AAT

With their mates at the top of the Administrative Appeals Tribunal, the Liberal government was able to fill the ranks with former staffers, party faithfuls and failed candidates.

The road from political backrooms to the people's court

The road from political backrooms to the people's court

A job at the top of the Administrative Appeals Tribunal is, by definition, apolitical. So why are so many gigs going to former Coalition politicians and staffers?

You’re out! How a government tamed the AAT

You’re out! How a government tamed the AAT

Members of the Administrative Appeals Tribunal are steadily losing their jobs and being replaced with people less qualified.

Meet the Liberal mates network that sits atop the AAT

Meet the Liberal mates network that sits atop the AAT

One's a former Western Australian state Liberal minister. The other was president of the Australian Liberal Students Federation. Both scored high-paying jobs on the Administrative Appeals Tribunal.

The attorney-general, transparency and the AAT

The attorney-general, transparency and the AAT

The attorney-general commissioned a review into the AAT, failed to disclose a key relationship and then shelved the findings for seven months while appointing more Liberal-linked members.