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Justine Landis-Hanley — Reporter

Justine Landis-Hanley

Reporter

Justine has just completed a media and philosophy degree at the University of Sydney. Her work has been published in The New York Times, The Saturday Paper and The Age. She has worked as a casual reporter for The Sydney Morning Herald, an international fellow to the Agence-France Presse Tokyo bureau, editor of student newspaper Honi Soit, and was The New York Times Australia bureau’s first reporting intern. Justine is passionate about gender equality, and has undertaken public policy research work and fellowships with the G20, the Australian Human Rights Commission, and the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women.

Did Centrelink just admit its debt collectors have mandatory targets?

Did Centrelink just admit its debt collectors have mandatory targets?

New evidence casts doubt on the Department of Human Services' claim that Centrelink staff aren't given set debt recovery targets.

AAT finally speaks following Senate estimates grilling

AAT finally speaks following Senate estimates grilling

The tribunal faced stiff questioning from Labor's Kim Carr over appointees' lack of legal qualifications.

It turns out you can put a positive spin on the climate crisis

It turns out you can put a positive spin on the climate crisis

In Senate estimates this week, a senior Department of Environment official spruiked the supposed benefits of climate change. God help us all.

Talk about talkback: who's for breakfast at the ABC in 2020?

Talk about talkback: who's for breakfast at the ABC in 2020?

As the ABC teases new radio appointments, Crikey gets some hints about movements yet to be made.

Miranda in Manhattan: checking in on News Corp's latest outrage export

Miranda in Manhattan: checking in on News Corp's latest outrage export

The News Corp columnist is adept at manufacturing outrage in Australia, but can she make a similar dent in the US punditosphere?

Is Lawyer X's lost 'libido' really in the public interest?

Is Lawyer X's lost 'libido' really in the public interest?

The Age's latest story about the Nicola Gobbo saga raises questions about responsible reporting on mental health.

Is it really that hard for chefs to pay minimum wage?

Is it really that hard for chefs to pay minimum wage?

Celebrity chefs are calling for an amnesty for employers who underpay their workers, insisting the Australia's labour laws are too complicated to follow. But the experts Crikey spoke to say it's not that hard.

2GB boss can't take his own medicine

2GB boss can't take his own medicine

Macquarie Media has spent millions on defamation payouts courtesy of its stable of shock jocks. But now CEO Adam Lang finds himself in the plaintiff's chair.

Why did the government declare war on the AAT? To uphold 'community standards'

Why did the government declare war on the AAT? To uphold 'community standards'

The government justifies its reshaping of the Administrative Appeals Tribunal by claiming it brings it into line with 'community standards'. For some seeking the tribunal's judgement, the changes could mean life or death.

How Tony Abbott made sure the AAT would never come under scrutiny

How Tony Abbott made sure the AAT would never come under scrutiny

Appointments to the Administrative Appeals Tribunal were once subject to review via a separate council... until the Abbott government gutted it.