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Charles Happell

Melbourne's claims to the title of Sports Capital of the World have been exposed this week as a sham, a hollow of piece of self-publicity that stands up to no scrutiny.

Melbourne's 'sports capital of the world' boast a sham

Melbourne's claims to the title of Sports Capital of the World have been exposed this week as a sham, a hollow of piece of self-publicity that stands up to no scrutiny.

Why do sporting greats make comebacks? Because they're competitors who get off on competing and never really get used to a world where the adulation and applause has died down, writes <i>Back Page Lead</i>'s <b>Charles Happell</b>.

Thorpe comeback: Jordan-esque success or Schu-like failure?

Why do sporting greats make comebacks? Because they're competitors who get off on competing and never really get used to a world where the adulation and applause has died down, writes Back Page Lead's Charles Happell.

Surely now, even the hyper-competitive little man from Adelaide -- who has more than made up for his physical shortcomings in 14 years of Grand Slam tennis with an unparalleled strength of mind -- must see the writing on the wall: his days of winning the biggest tournaments are over.

The end of the road for lil' Lleyton Hewitt?

Surely now, even the hyper-competitive little man from Adelaide -- who has more than made up for his physical shortcomings in 14 years of Grand Slam tennis with an unparalleled strength of mind -- must see the writing on the wall: his days of winning the biggest tournaments are over.

To go cap in hand and beg Tiger Woods’ management company for a second visit is a tawdry and faintly obscene move by the Victorian government, writes <b>Charles Happell</b>.

Getting Tiger Woods here again defies common sense

To go cap in hand and beg Tiger Woods’ management company for a second visit is a tawdry and faintly obscene move by the Victorian government, writes Charles Happell.

The AFL again has reached for its sledgehammer in handing out hefty penalties to six AFL figures caught betting on matches. Perhaps the League should save the leg-irons and manacles for the time they catch out some <em>real</em> crooks.

AFL betting ... and a sledgehammer to crush walnuts

The AFL again has reached for its sledgehammer in handing out hefty penalties to six AFL figures caught betting on matches. Perhaps the League should save the leg-irons and manacles for the time they catch out some real crooks.

As a former chief football reporter for the <em>West Australian</em>, <b>Charles Happell</b> has seen Mick Malthouse's temper many times first hand. And Malthouse's latest spray -- calling St Kilda's Stephen Milne a "f%cking rapist" -- doesn't surprise him.

Malthouse has form when it comes to losing his temper

As a former chief football reporter for the West Australian, Charles Happell has seen Mick Malthouse's temper many times first hand. And Malthouse's latest spray -- calling St Kilda's Stephen Milne a "f%cking rapist" -- doesn't surprise him.

The appointment of John Howard as International Cricket Council president from 2012 is more due to his diplomatic nous and less because of his awful bowling technique.

Howard, the diplomat, may prevail as ICC president

The appointment of John Howard as International Cricket Council president from 2012 is more due to his diplomatic nous and less because of his awful bowling technique.

At a moment when we’ve just emerged from recession, when childhood obesity in Australia is at an all-time high and when some state schools have little or no sporting equipment -- let alone PE teachers -- David Crawford’s report into Olympic funding couldn't have come at a better time.

Any sport in a storm: Coates and Co cop a reality check

At a moment when we’ve just emerged from recession, when childhood obesity in Australia is at an all-time high and when some state schools have little or no sporting equipment -- let alone PE teachers -- David Crawford’s report into Olympic funding couldn't have come at a better time.

China's economic growth will not be a panacea to the world's financial woes so long as it remains a largely undemocratic state, says <b>Alan Kohler</b>: it isn't a consumer society, and the export dollars just aren't there.

Kohler: Why China won't save the world

China's economic growth will not be a panacea to the world's financial woes so long as it remains a largely undemocratic state, says Alan Kohler: it isn't a consumer society, and the export dollars just aren't there.

On the one-year anniversary of Barack Obama's landslide win, the winds of change appear to have shifted, with two Republican candidates winning seats in this year's state elections. Is this a sign that voters are becoming increasingly disaffected with the new President and his party?

Republicans stage a comeback

On the one-year anniversary of Barack Obama's landslide win, the winds of change appear to have shifted, with two Republican candidates winning seats in this year's state elections. Is this a sign that voters are becoming increasingly disaffected with the new President and his party?

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There are 124 articles by Charlie Happell