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Bernard Keane

Politics editor

Bernard Keane — Politics editor

Bernard Keane is Crikey’s political editor. Before that he was Crikey’s Canberra press gallery correspondent, covering politics, national security and economics.

Rolling in the deepfakes

Rolling in the deepfakes

This week: how deepfake is your love, the worm turns, where the moonshots came from, and a solitary life in the army of shadows.

Cracks in building regulation could bring the building industry down

Cracks in building regulation could bring the building industry down

What happens when people realise they can't trust new apartment construction? An industry already in trouble could hit the wall, and pull the economy down with it.

Has anyone got the capacity to solve poor wages growth?

Has anyone got the capacity to solve poor wages growth?

The Reserve Bank knows that wages aren't growing, but doesn't know why, and doesn't know what level of unemployment is needed to get them growing.

Mooted spy powers would deliver heaven for commercial spies

Mooted spy powers would deliver heaven for commercial spies

The expansion of the powers of the Australian Signals Directorate would establish a new golden era of commercial espionage in Australia — and damage Australian companies.

Setka shows why unions and Labor have failed on wage stagnation

Setka shows why unions and Labor have failed on wage stagnation

At a time when unions should be on the front foot and pushing for structural changes to address wage stagnation, figures like John Setka play into right-wing campaigns to demonise the union movement.

Home Affairs power grab rings alarm bells among spies

Home Affairs power grab rings alarm bells among spies

The Home Affairs portfolio is continuing its relentless empire-building, pressing for part-control of military intelligence — and giving spies access to a vast new trove of corporate and personal information.

The banks are bastards — and making you wealthier

The banks are bastards — and making you wealthier

Despite the fallout of the banking royal commission, the big banks have led the way in lifting the stock market in 2018-19.

What hope for whistleblowers in the government's war on scrutiny?

What hope for whistleblowers in the government's war on scrutiny?

Whistleblowers in the public service face few good options for revealing wrongdoing. Intelligence agency officials have none.

Corporations start to question Business Council's climate denialism

Corporations start to question Business Council's climate denialism

Companies are finally starting to work out what the Business Council's climate change policy is: vaguely supporting action, then sabotaging any efforts to actually do anything.

Of ice and men

Of ice and men

This week: the perils of privilege, the whitening of pot, invisible galaxies, Modi's dark victory, and what freezing does to language.