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Amber Schultz — Reporter

Amber Schultz

Reporter

Amber previously worked for Nine News and The Age and created student comedy talk show The Struggle. She was a Young Walkley finalist, Jacoby-Walkley scholar, and won an Ossie Our Watch award. Amber holds a Masters in International Relations and Journalism and is fluent in Spanish.

University of Sydney has asked staff to 'suggest' how to cut up to 30% of jobs in some faculties.

Why are we seeing an explosion in university cheating scandals?

Experts and students are concerned that cracking down on cheats doesn't get to the heart of the issue.

Alek Sigley a 29-year-old Australian after being released from detention in North Korea. (Image: AP/Kyodo)

Saving private citizens: how Australia uses diplomacy to rescue prisoners

Alek Sigley's removal from North Korean detention is a happy ending, but what does the saga say about Australia's ability to extricate citizens?

Protesters rail against plastic and cardboard going into landfill (Image: AAP/James Ross)

Why is Australia in the middle of a recycling crisis?

Every week Australians wheel their yellow recycling bins to the curb. But as more and more countries refuse to deal with our "contaminated" plastics, it's clear we need to rethink our approach.

Winning the hearts, minds (and pockets) of doctors

If Novo Nordisk is to fulfil the potential of its anti-obesity drug Saxenda, it needs more doctors to have a new understanding of how obesity really works. And to prescribe. Again and again.

(Image: Unsplash/Stefie Zawa)

What's the point of a religious discrimination act? 

While our current religious discrimination laws vary from state to state, and are at times contradictory, would having a consistent religious discrimination act be a good thing?

The commercial bet on obesity designed to ‘create the market’

The race to find a pharmacological way to combat obesity is on — and in addition to financial pressures, it has proven devilishly difficult to make an obesity drug that is effective, safe and works at scale, across a population.

Is obesity a 'disease'? And, if it is, who wins?

Getting doctors and medical bodies to classify obesity as a 'disease' would be a huge win for pharmaceutical companies. Here's how they're trying to do just that.

(Image: Akshay Chauhan/Unsplash)

The pros and cons of selling Australia's education to the world

What would selling Australian curriculum like the HSC and VCE mean for our economy, and is it viable? We've done our homework.

Obesity, politics, money and a company called Novo Nordisk

Novo Nordisk wants to change the way Australians think about obesity. And if it is successful, it could make a killing.

Celibacy and obedience: life inside a seminary

INQ visits a modern seminary, historically obscured from public view, and speaks to priests in training — as well as to some who opted out — to find out about the changing reality and day-to-day lives of those on the path to priesthood.

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There are 260 articles by Amber Schultz