Shane Bazzi, left, who won his appeal case against Peter Dutton (Image: AAP//Dan Himbrechts/Mick Tsikas)
Shane Bazzi, left, who won his appeal case against Peter Dutton (Image: AAP/Dan Himbrechts/Mick Tsikas)

Tides are turning all over the place. Women have shredded the man-friendly Liberal Party, relegating its bizarre brand of toxic masculinity to what should be a long term in opposition and maybe even electoral oblivion.

Is it coincidental that another front in the gender war, the one being fought in our defamation courts, has also turned decidedly against the previously ascendant males? Short answer: no. Observed from altitude, these shifts are part of a wider trend.

It had been widely thought, after Geoffrey Rush’s huge victory in his defamation case against The Daily Telegraph, that Australia’s plaintiff-leaning defamation laws had killed off -- or at least crippled -- the Me Too movement here. More significantly, a bunch of men read into that case’s outcome a promise that was never really there: that in defamation litigation lies vindication, happily laced with buckets of money.