Kristina Keneally
(Image: AAP/Lukas Coch)

Within a few short days of the new Labor leadership team being revealed, much has already been written about the reemergence of Kristina Keneally as a central figurehead. Crikey readers added to the discussion about the former premier’s role in the “new” Labor. Elsewhere, readers discussed the fortunes of News Corp and the mishandling of Australia’s natural gas industry.

On Kristina Keneally

David Coles writes: I’m looking forward to the contest. Keneally has demonstrated the capacity to fight and to cut through while doing so. To add to that she has a religious faith that seems to cause her to speak with compassion. Dutton will need to be careful. He risks sounding like a bully and copping a decent whack at the same time.

Paul Hughes writes: Sadly this looks like a repetition of Kristina Keneally copping the poisoned chalice that nobody else wants. First the NSW premiership in a doomed government, now the Manus Island debacle that K-Rudd created and the Libs have been dining out on ever since.

Jill Dixon writes: Last year Shaun Hanns, a senior bureaucrat at Home Affairs who had recently resigned, sent a letter to every federal MP. In it he showed his analysis of trend data over the last ten years or so, looking at boat arrival numbers in relation to changes in offshore detention policy. He found no correlation. Instead, sadly, the numbers fluctuated according to boat turn backs. Kristina Keneally would have received this letter, also I believe Shaun went to the Labor party conference in December last year. So why do Labor perpetuate this myth? 

On News Corp

Laurie Patton writes: Perhaps News Corp should reflect on the fact that the more they support the rabid right the fewer people will want to buy their product. Do they want to influence politics or make money? Their choice.

On natural gas

Peter Schulz writes: The MSM seem to be so busy screeching about the Greens plotting to “deindustrialise” Australia that they’ve missed this bunch of clowns actually doing it.

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