SPILL REDUX

The Australian ($) reports Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull could face a second leadership challenge, after a slew of resignations were handed to the PM yesterday following Peter Dutton‘s attempt to seize control of the Liberal Party. While The Daily Telegraph reports cabinet ministers Michael Keenan, Steve Ciobo and Greg Hunt also offered to resign, however they have been asked to stay on by the PM.

Supporters of Dutton suggested yesterday there could be a new leadership challenge when parliament returns next month. However, Turnbull supporters believe it could be as early as Thursday. The Courier Mail ($) also reports that Dutton may not be the only contender for a looming leadership challenge, with Treasurer Scott Morrison a potential “consensus candidate”.

WHOS’S, UH, GOING TO REPLACE HUSAR?

The Sydney Morning Herald reports that New South Wales Labor is “struggling to find” a replacement for Emma Husar to run in the western Sydney seat of Lindsay. After Tuesday’s leadership spill that some believe could result in an early federal election, the SMH reports the state party is eager to speed up the process and may have to “parachute in a candidate or a high-profile MP”, with party officials “urgently” completing background checks to fill the senate ticket.

RIP-OFF MERCHANTS

Australian travel company Flight Centre has been accused of encouraging travel consultants to gouge customers by unnecessarily inflating prices, according to ABC Investigations. The company has also been accused of underpaying staff and promoting an “alcohol-fueled” work culture. An investigation into Flight Centre’s alleged mistreatment of employees has been undertaken by the Fair Work Ombudsman.

THEY REALLY SAID THAT?

The member for Dickson sitting on the lap of the member for Warringah like a really scary wooden puppet come to life, with the hand of the Member for Warringah up is um … back.”

Tanya Plibersek

As Tony Abbott fiddled with his glasses and former Home Affairs minister Peter Dutton looked busy with his papers, Tanya Plibersek delivered a scathing assessment of the Coalition backbench during question time yesterday.

CRIKEY QUICKIE: THE BEST OF YESTERDAY

“After the leadership spill, the parliamentary theatre comes. The vanquished take their place on the backbench; the victor the chair at the Despatch Box, the opposition prepares to attack. And so it unfolded Tuesday afternoon after the morning’s Liberal leadership ballot. Peter Dutton took a position up at the far back; Malcolm Turnbull took his usual seat as Prime Minister, but one with the support of less than 60% of his colleagues.”

“Becoming an incarcerated refugee doesn’t necessarily make you a better person, even though the refugee has become the new “subject of history”, replacing the workers, with their annoying habit of embourgeoisification. Anti-black racism is a global phenomenon. Furthermore, many local inhabitants of Manus are so desperately poor that they resent the meagre allowances and goods the detained refugees receive.”

“Hard on the heels of Friday’s panicked back-down on the National Energy Guarantee came an Ipsos poll for the Fairfax papers that recorded a blowout in Labor’s two-party lead from 51-49 to 55-45, together with a 10% increase in Malcolm Turnbull’s disapproval rating.

“The proximity of these events gives a misleading impression of cause and effect, but the poll was in fact conducted between Wednesday and Saturday, meaning any damage it recorded must have been suffered by the government beforehand.”

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Australia wilts from climate change, why can’t its politicians act?

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‘Shocked and hurt’: Actress Asia Argento hits back at sexual assault allegations

Madonna slammed for ‘disrespectful’ Aretha Franklin tribute at MTV VMAs

WHAT’S ON TODAY

Melbourne

  • Victorian parliament sits.

  • Final day for the committal hearing on Malcolm Hooper, former chiropractor and owner of oxygen therapy clinic, Oxymed Australia, who was charged with breaches of workplace safety after the death of a client. Craig Dawson died after using a hyperbaric chamber in April last year. The Melbourne Magistrates Court will determine if there’s enough evidence to send the case to trial.

  • Coroners Court of Victoria will make available coronial findings into the death of 62-year-old Sonia Sofianopolous who was found dead in her Greensborough DHHS unit from carbon monoxide toxicity in 2017.

  • Bravehearts will launch its child protection education campaign ‘Ditto Keep Safe Adventure Show’. The person safety program is aimed at children to help keep them safe from situations of sexual assault and bullying.

  • Community health dentists and agencies of the Victorian branch of the Australian Dental Association will stage a walk-out and public demonstration today over a pay dispute. The ADA is asking for a 19.2% pay increase, as was given to Victorian hospital dentists.

  • CEDA will give a speech on health, safety and the future of work.

  • The nominees for Telstra Ballet Dancer of the Year will be announced. Nominees go in the running for a $20,000 prize.

Traralgon

  • Environment Victoria, Voices of the Valley, Environmental Justice Australia and Healthy Futures to hold a press conference after the EPA’s s20B Conference: Communities take back power relating to its review of coal power station licences. Those in attendance will be Environment Victoria Climate Change campaigner Cat Nadel.

Brisbane

  • Queensland parliament sits. 

    Abortion law reform will be  introduced to Queensland palriament to decriminalise the practice. Queensland and NSW are the only Australian states to outlaw abortion.

  • Appeal over the freezing of Clive Palmer’s assets will be held. Palmer was ordered to disclose his personal assets as part of the ongoing legal dispute with Queensland Nickel Liquidators.

Canberra

  • Megan O’Connell, director of the education think tank, Mitchell Institute, will address leaders of the early learning sector and call for both sides of the political divide to commit to improving sector quality. This follows the Senate Select Committee’s report on whether childhood educators should have qualifications.

  • The House Standing Committee on Economics to hold an inquiry into impediments to business investment.

  • Joint Standing Committee on Migration to hold an inquiry into the efficacy of current regulation of Australian migration agents.

  • The Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit will conduct an inquiry based on the Auditor-General’s report on the audits of the financial statements of Australian government entities for 2017. The inquiry will consider matters raised in the report including: equity investment, concessional loans and management of IT controls.

  • The Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit will hold an inquiry based on the Auditor General’s report on mental health in the Australian Federal Police.

  • House Standing Committee on Industry, Innovation, Science and Resources will hold an inquiry into how the mining sector can support businesses in regional economies.

  • New Zealand Deputy Prime Minister and Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters to speak at the National Press Club’s ‘Australia and New Zealand working together in a changing world.’

Sydney

  • Newcrest Mining, A2 Milk Company, Carsales.com, Inghams Group to release their full year results.

Adelaide

  • Independent Commissioner Against Corruption Bruce Lander is expected to face a parliamentary inquiry.

  • The inquest into the 2014 death of construction worker Mr Jorge Castillo-Riffo at the New Royal Adelaide Hospital continues. Mr Castillo-Riffo was found crushed between the scissor lift and the slab of floor above him. Senior Work Health and Safety inspector at SafeWork SA Stacey Vinall and Shane Moss to be heard as witnesses.

Perth

  • Western Australia state parliament sits.

Darwin

  • Northern Territory parliament sits.

Hobart

  • Tasmanian parliament resumes with bikie-gang legislation and the sacking of female Cricket Australia staffer on the agenda.

  • Peter Jeffrey Rose, will be sentenced at the Hobart Supreme Court for causing $3000 in damages to the Spirit of Tasmania during a drunken rampage.

Australia

  • AMSA Global Health Conference, 2018 continues. The event brings together more than 700 medical students from Australia and New Zealand.

  • The 8th annual Be Medicinewise Week continues, encouraging families across Australia to be conscious of their medical decisions and health choices.

Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane, Perth, Adelaide, Hobart

  • Ride share drivers expected to strike against Uber by switching off the app and not taking Uber fares for two hours. This is the second round of strikes to be held by members of Ride Share Drivers United, urging Uber to improve pay conditions.

THE COMMENTARIAT

Centre-Right implosion has Australia turning left ($) – Paul Kelly (The Australian): “The Liberals with their special brand of panic are now close to a lose-lose scenario. While Turnbull is diminished probably beyond recovery Dutton is neither an obvious political saviour nor assured vote winner. By pulling down Turnbull for Dutton the Liberals have made a fateful call. Many MPs felt they faced their doom and had nothing to lose — but once this fatalism seeps into a government it becomes terminal.”

 

What’s so momentous that the country must discard its prime minister? ($) – Peter Hartcher (The Brisbane Times): “By turning to Peter Dutton as their alternative, the conservatives certainly can’t be accused of engaging in a popularity contest. As Dutton himself concedes, he’s hardly Mr Charisma. Whenever credible pollsters ask the voters to name their preferred Liberal leader, Dutton has never cracked double digits. The conservatives are turning to Dutton as a statement of conviction and an act of reclamation. Dutton is one of their own.”

Talking Point: Don’t panic, weedkiller has been helping us, not hurting us ($) – Jan Davis (The Mercury): “Farmers reckon glyphosate is a good news story, because it has reduced the total volume of pesticides and herbicides needed to grow Roundup-resistant crops. It has enabled minimum tillage production systems which have protected soil structure, improved soil moisture retention and increased soil carbon storage. It is one of the main reasons for increased yields of wheat, which have quadrupled in the last 50 years.”

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