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Will Turnbull be so popular once the bad news starts rolling in?

Super Saturday may have told us everything or nothing about the state of the Libs and their popularity.

The fallout from the spate of wins by Labor at last month’s byelections continues with readers wondering whether Turnbull has as much electoral goodwill in the tank as some polls would have us believe. 

On what Super Saturday means for the Coalition

Arky writes: The political media spent two months doing nothing but talking down Labor and Shorten and giving Turnbull no scrutiny at all. This is the lagging indicator of that extended armchair ride for Mr Turnbull. There may actually be some scrutiny in the works for Turnbull’s policies as the media is dragged kicking and screaming into talking about energy policy, talking about this Great Barrier Reef slushfund to backdoor funds to Liberal supporters like Channel Nine and mining companies. On the history of the past few years, all Turnbull rises are based on the periods he’s without scrutiny and it all falls away again once people actually have to look at him again.

Marcus Hicks writes: Come on, Bludger. Surely the recent by-elections proved that Newspoll may be significantly overstating the primary vote of the Coalition, given how it utterly collapsed in Longman. That, coupled with their change to distribution of preferences is a clear attempt to make the Librorts Party look much more in contention than they truly are.

On underemployment and its links to mental health 

CML writes: Well said, Jason. Apart from the effect depression has on the individual, mental ill-health costs the economy a fortune…particularly if not diagnosed and treated in the early stages. Far worse is the spectre of suicide in this group of underemployed.All very well for those who have a full time job…or as much work as they want…but you are right in saying this ‘problem’ needs to be addressed for those left behind.

Kyle Hargreaves writes: Overall not too bad Jason. Some forecasts (appealing to the data) to (e.g.) 2021 would have been useful.  As to a proxy for depression : it ought to be simple. Just calculate the prescriptions for depression-like drugs per month per state and note the change over time. This data ought to be in existence although given personalities of GPs and patients it could not be 100% reliable.

Send your comments, corrections, clarifications and cock-ups to [email protected]. We reserve the right to edit comments for length and clarity. Please include your full name.

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Arky
Arky
3 years ago

Whoever picks these seems to like me. I do appreciate it!

Arky
Arky
3 years ago
Reply to  Arky

And with a month of hindsight, especially well done for pickiing out that comment because it turned out to be 100% on the money!

braddybear
braddybear
3 years ago

with all political polling its not the figures that reflect the real story, its how the questions are asked, LOADED QUESTESTIONS EQUAL LOADED POLLS. no sensible voter will pay any notice of the polls till the one just before voting closes, thats published next day, same as super saturday, then they`ll claim a late swing distorted the figures.

braddybear
braddybear
3 years ago

with all political polling its not the figures that reflect the real story, its how the questions are asked, LOADED QUESTESTIONS EQUAL LOADED POLLS. no sensible voter will pay any notice of the polls till the one just before voting closes, thats published next day, same as super saturday, then they`ll claim a late swing distorted the figures.

AR
AR
3 years ago

In the NYer’s investigation of the opioid overprescription in 2017, the company which marketed OxyContin, Purdue, used unemployment stats. to target doctors in those areas for special attention to increase the sales.
Worked a treat.