Closing ceremony damage control. Seven Network presenters, commentators and athletes have worked themselves into a frenzy overnight over the host broadcaster NEP’s failure to show images of athletes parading into last night’s Closing Ceremony. At the end of the ceremony, Australian rights holder Seven’s hosts Johanna Griggs and Basil Zempilas were at pains to advise viewers that the decision not to show athletes lay, not with Seven, but with NEP.

Organising committee chair Peter Beattie has this morning apologised, saying it was a mistake. NEP has also acknowledged the upset on Twitter, referring the decision to exclude the athletes from the live broadcast back to the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games Corporation.

Rights and media accreditation have been a hot topic throughout these games, with Australia’s two biggest news companies News Corp and Fairfax refusing to apply for media accreditation, citing excessive restrictions. Nine’s accreditation was also  suspended after it “mistakenly” broadcast footage of the Opening Ceremony dress rehearsal.

The Oz’s great readership, according to whom? A headline atop a small story in The Weekend Australian boasted: “Print readership soars — thank you, Australia”. The story said the paper had “maintained its status as the nation’s best-performing major news brand, growing its print readership to 620,000, according to the latest industry date”. 

No mention of the source for the numbers, no breakdown between physical sales of print copies, no breakdown of digital impressions for the websites, just bombastic assertions. All very creative and all very opaque. — Glenn Dyer 

Daily Fail. Even for Daily Mail Australi— often brutal in its descriptions of its story subjects — a paragraph that got through the subeditors yesterday was a bit over-the-top. At the end of a run-of-the-mill write-up on Bachelor in Paradise cast member Florence Alexandra’s social media post about a cosmetic procedure, reporter April Glover signed off the piece with: “But most people who were educated at a high-school level know these vapid cunts only go on the shows to find mediocre Instagram fame and make a living promoting teeth whiteners and unnecessary cosmetic procedures.”

The offending paragraph was left in the story for about two hours before it was removed. The Mails sworn enemy, the Daily Telegraph, wrote up the error on page three of today’s paper, quoting Alexandra as saying she’s consulted her lawyers (and that, with English as her second language, didn’t previously know what “vapid” meant).

In a statement, Daily Mail Australia apologised for the “inappropriate language” in the article, and said the offensive wording was removed when they became aware. It said it would “properly investigate how the offending words were published”.

Ten communications boss departs. Ten’s head corporate spinner Neil Shoebridge is leaving the network to establish his own consultancy. He has been in the role since early 2012, and will finish up towards the end of May. A statement from Ten said he would continue to work with Ten as a consultant. A replacement is yet to be announced.

Glenn Dyer’s TV Ratings. Games over, Games over, normal transmission has been resumed. A total of 1.58 million watched the Glory section and then 1.53 million watched the closing. Averaged across the two programs, a very sold 1.55 million people, which was easily more than any other program last night except for Seven News with 1.99 million and MRK’s  1.88 million.

The Voice — 1.45 million nationally for the launch last night, went head to head with MKR from 7pm and lost out, finishing well behind.

In the regions Seven News won with 649,000, from MKR with 582,000, The Commonwealth Games Glory was 3rd with 470,000, the Closing Ceremony with 440,000, and The Voice was 5th with 427,000. Read the rest on the Crikey website

Peter Fray

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