Today in Media Files, Rebel Wilson has blocked a Herald Sun journalist reporting on her case, and Hurricane Irma has produced one very sweet moment of live TV.

Rebel blocking without a cause. Rebel Wilson has, apparently without explanation, blocked the Herald Sun‘s Shannon Deery from seeing her tweets, just before she responded to her record defamation win yesterday. Deery has been reporting on the case for the Melbourne tabloid. He hadn’t been particularly sympathetic to the star, who claimed she’d need $7 million in special damages and lost earnings because of a series of articles in Woman’s Day. Wilson was awarded $4.65 million in damages in the Victorian Supreme Court yesterday, the highest ever awarded in Australia.

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Government handouts don’t help (says ABC presenter). Emma Alberici, the host of the ABC’s Lateline TV program, might be onto something with her tweet last night about media handouts wrangled as part of media reform negotiations. But we can’t help but note that Alberici works for an entirely taxpayer-funded public broadcaster, and is saying money from the government doesn’t help grow an audience.

Benjamin Lawfare continues. With the Oz‘s somewhat diminished “cut and paste” section jumping into … well it’s difficult to know what they’re doing. The section references your correspondent’s suggestion that Law’s “hate-fuck” tweet was getting a free pass from some folks, then calls Law’s tweet “violent”, then calls me “PC”, then refers back to a seven-year-old article of mine on male couple adoption (against), then to a transgression of mine from last year rendered so obscurely that the point is lost, then moves on to Kevin Rudd. Helluva job. Hard to tell what the cutty-paster’s point is, but it’s not impossible they are someone more than a little conflicted about working on the page that hosted Bill Leak’s Waffen-SSM cartoon, and the organisation featuring Andrew Bolt’s “gay gestapo”. Perhaps Christian Kerr’s successor in the ejector seat has invented a new variation, the “hate-wank”? — Guy Rundle

Video of the day. In a pretty sweet moment of live TV during Hurricane Irma coverage on Fox Business News, correspondent Jeff Flock — known for his coverage of natural disasters on US cable TV — stopped by his mum’s house to see how she was doing after the storm in Englewood, Florida. The interview was unplanned and, after the cameraman got shots of a framed magazine cover Flock appeared on, and some family snaps, Vicki Flock, 91, blurted out that she didn’t like Lou Dobbs, one of network’s anchors (but confirmed she was a fan of Stuart Varney, who was on air for the segment).

The revolving door. The first female editor of Time is stepping down after more than 30 years at the magazine. Nancy Gibbs started at Time as a fact checker, and she told Vanity Fair she was still working out what she would do next. “At a time when there’s a conversation about women in newsrooms and women leading newsrooms, I don’t think it’s a small thing that this company put a woman in charge of its flagship,” she said.

Glenn Dyer’s TV Ratings. Gruen returned to the ABC last night at 8.30pm with a solid audience who obviously enjoyed the formula —  1.272 million national viewers tuned in (903,000 in the metros and a top 10 program). Success. Yep, but wait, there’s more.

Unlike the promos for the program which told us companies know more about us than ever, we found last night that we know less about modern media and marketing via Gruen than at any time. There were the two legacy median veterans in Todd Sampson (Fairfax Media director) and Russel Howcroft (former Ten Network boss in Melbourne now at PwC, which has a respected media analysis business here and offshore). Dee Madigan was on the panel again (she is a Gruen veteran). — Read the rest on the Crikey website

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Peter Fray
Peter Fray
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