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Media

Sep 13, 2017

Should you care about media reform?

Are you going to notice a difference in your local news bulletin as a result of the media law changes?

As the media reform saga drags on (and on, and on) through Parliament, there’s been frothing and hand-wringing by those both for and against.

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13 comments

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13 thoughts on “Should you care about media reform?

  1. John Hall

    Internet, Internet, internet. Younger people just don’t get papers and TV anymore. I am a baby boomer but get most of my news online and Internet Radio too. The ‘old’ players are becoming increasingly irrelavent.

  2. old greybearded one

    This will be another example of the Nationals betraying their alleged constituency.

  3. leon knight

    Extra power for Lord Moloch is no big deal any more, his papers are now widely seen as the propaganda and rent-seeking rags they are, and he will be dead soon anyway….and the chance of another as evil as he taking over is small.

    1. JMNO

      He may live as long and robustly as his mother

      1. brian crooks

        MURDOCH WILL BE CALLED HOME SOON, THE DEVIL NEEDS HIM, THERE IS MUCH WORK TO BE DONE AS THE LAST GENERATION OF CONSERVATIVE POLITICIANS WILL BE HEADING DOWN SOON AND THE FIRES WILL NEED STOKING AND HOWARDS CELL WILL NEED PREPARING

  4. Jack Robertson

    Oh, Meeja Reform, Shmeeja Reform. Right now the absurd Rebel Wilson pay-out is a far more salient harbinger of the Fourth’s increasingly crimped future, frankly. It’s a disaster for journalism, both in damages size and ruling basis. Our defo laws were already the number one news-killer in the joint, but for some tinsel rag to have to hand over $5M + for the alleged impact of a bit of vaguely over-massaged but bog-standard Show Biz gossip-guff on the ‘reputation/future earnings’ of the kind of C-Lister only too happy to dance the Junk Meeja/celeb fantasy tango when it suits spells catastrophe for serious reporting on serious power.

    1. PDGFD1

      On the other hand – ‘tinsel rags’ as well as bog-paper print meeja might actually think twice before they print something they already know to be false.

  5. geejay

    The media reform should have included requirements to supply audio description on TV. The US, UK, Canada, many European countries have it. NZ has had it since 2011. But there’s no requirement in Australia.

  6. Graham R

    I sympathise with Kristy Hess: here in Perth the ABC radio bulletins always end by telling me how the Fassifern Fucknuckles went against the Nerrigundah Knuckledraggers in the rugby.

    This is just insulting and makes a mockery of the ABC being a “national” broadcaster. Clearly they are a Sydney broadcaster.

    1. PDGFD1

      Complain to the government(s) who cut their funding such that local stations, even quite major ones, like Adelaide’s, had to ‘fold’.

  7. AR

    There are many parallels between the various dying, superseded legacy forms of money making, – whether the meeja, stranded industry/assets and forms of political, religious & economic power.
    Like the proverbial, tiny brained dinosaur taking a while to realise that it is dead, our society has quite a few zombies stumbling around, sticking up the place and demanding scarce resources to keep them in the style to which they’ve become accustomed.
    Unfortunately, many livelihoods are provided by those still, slightly warm carcasses and the people watching their lunch and sense of self evaporate will do unconscionable things to stop it happening.
    Buggywhip makers of the world unite, you’ve nothing to lose but everything.

  8. klewso

    I reckon it will be interesting to see if reality matches what little Eddie Munster Xenophon thinks he’s helped birth.
    The titanic media groups buying regional servers – then centralising production to the city, cutting regional jobs? A continuation of business as usual : at cost to regional interests.

  9. Xoanon

    Seems there’s an opening for new media outfits to set themselves up on websites aggressively targeting and serving local areas, particularly country regions. Local advertising money has to go somewhere, after all.