More fabulous batting from Ross Taylor, Steve Smith and Adam Voges yesterday and last night made Nine the network of the day, and that wasn’t just me and John Howard (although he was at a black tie dinner last night at the old Olympic Stadium for the 10th anniversary of the Socceroos win that put Australia into the World Cup for the first time in 32 years). Or was it The Block afterwards? The on-air plugs during the fourth day of the test at times reminded me of regional Australian TV from the 1960s and 70s: flat, dull and enough to make you want to not watch the program being plugged.

The final session of the test had 1.433 million viewers across the country. A pretty good audience. It proved more popular than The Block with 1.325 million (which followed the end of play in the cricket) and meant Nine had a big audience for much of prime time. The X Factor managed a solid 1.424 million on Seven and up against the Test. The news broadcasts on Nine, Seven and the ABC again proved very popular in the metros where the cricket and the singing and troweling were out-rated by the 6-to-7pm programs on Seven and Nine: the test, The X Factor and The Block coming in at fifth, sixth and seventh respectively in the metros, behind Nine and Seven News and their 6.30pm programs.

Network channel share:

  1. Nine (29.6%)
  2. Seven (28.7%)
  3. ABC (19.3%)
  4. Ten (18.0%)
  5. SBS (4.4%)

Network main channels:

  1. Nine (21.6%)
  2. Seven (19.9%)
  3. ABC (15.3%)
  4. Ten (13.2%)
  5. SBS ONE (3.5%)

Top 5 digital channels: 

  1. 7TWO, 7mate (4.4%)
  2. Gem (4.3%)
  3. GO (3.7%)
  4. ONE 2.5%)

Top 10 national programs:

  1. Nine News — 1.553 million
  2. 2nd Test: Aust v NZ, Day 4, session 3 (Nine) 1.433 million
  3. The X Factor (Seven) 1.424 million
  4. Seven News 1.337 million
  5. The Block (Nine) 1.325 million
  6. ABC News  1.240 million
  7. Home and Away (Seven) 1.190 million
  8. Nine News 6.30 1.101 million
  9. Seven News/ Today Tonight — 1.040 million
  10. TBL Families (Ten)  1.031 million

Top metro programs:

  1. Nine News – 1.105 million
  2. Nine News 6.30 — 1.101million
  3. Seven News — 1.058 million
  4. Seven News/Today Tonight — 1.012 million

Losers: There was enough content last night to please everyone — news junkies, renovators, singers, dieters, and sporting cricket types.

Metro news and current affairs:

  1. Nine News  1.105 million
  2. Nine News 6.30 — 1.101million
  3. Seven News — 1.058 million
  4. Seven News/ Today Tonight — 1.012 million
  5. A Current Affair Terror Special (Nine)  861,000
  6. ABC News – 860,000
  7. 7.30 (ABC) — 776,000
  8. Australian Story (ABC) 692,000
  9. Q&A (ABC) — 672,000
  10. Media Watch (ABC) 633,000

Morning TV:

  1. Sunrise (Seven) – 353,000
  2. Today (Nine) – 343,000
  3. The Morning Show (Seven) — 146,000
  4. News Breakfast (ABC 1,  85,000 + 58,000 on News 24) — 143,000
  5. Mornings (Nine) — 122,000
  6. Studio 10 (Ten) — 68,000

Top five pay TV channels:

  1. Fox8 (2.1%)
  2. TVHITS (2.0%)
  3. Disney Jr (1.9%)
  4. LifeStyle (1.8%)
  5. Nick Jr (1.7%)

Top five pay TV programs:

  1. Football; November 16 (Fox Sports 4)  65,000
  2. The Simpsons (Fox8) – 63,000
  3. The Simpsons (Fox8)  62,000
  4. The Walking Dead (FX)   59,000
  5. A Place To Call Home rpt (SoHo)   52,000

*Data © OzTAM Pty Limited 2014. The data may not be reproduced, published or communicated (electronically or in hard copy) in whole or in part, without the prior written consent of OzTAM. (All shares on the basis of combined overnight 6pm to midnight all people.) and network reports.

Peter Fray

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