A tired Dancing With the Stars vs a tired looking second series of The Block for 2015 — late year ratings fatigue was on display last night (and Ten was another weak performer). But nothing wrong with a strong 60 Minutes last night and a solid Sunday Night. Both might appear as afterthoughts to the diet of reality programs on their respective networks, but when they get it together, they stand out like beacons of viewing hope amid the dross. Sunday Night was the most watched of the two nationally, with 1.654 million from 60 Minutes 1.609 million. 60 Minutes was the most watched report in the metros though thanks to its report on the disappearance a year ago of three year old William Tyrrell.

Nine did well in the demos as Dancing With the Stars skewed old. Dancing and The Block go head-to-head tonight. But there was another example of the best rule of thumb of all about the attractiveness to viewers of last night’s prime time lineup — not one non-news show made it into the top three in the metros and the regions. The Block was fourth in the metros and fifth nationally. By the way 60 Minutes started at 8.30pm and attracted more viewers than The Block — that’s a telling judgement (and a right one) by viewers (the difference was more than 200,000 nationally, an hour later).

Seven is looking to wake up next week with its September new shows rush. Nine’s stalwart The Block though is not looking good — a bit like the housing market — the late bloom is fading and the chill winds of reality approach. It is a sign of Nine’s desperation that after two spoilers (Reno Rumble and Hotplate) that its most notable late year programming move has been another series of The Block. At least Seven had sense and canned a second series of House Rules for this year (it had to after it was flattened in the stupid head to head with Reno Rumble).

Network channel share:

  1. Nine (30.0%)
  2. Seven (29.9%)
  3. ABC (17.6%)
  4. Ten (15.6%)
  5. SBS (6.9%)

Network main channels:

  1. Nine (23.4%)
  2. Seven (22.9%)
  3. ABC (13.4%)
  4. Ten (9.4%)
  5. SBS ONE (5.7%)

Top digital channels: 

  1. GO (3.9%)
  2. 7mate (3.6%)
  3. 7TWO (3.4%)
  4. ONE, Eleven (3.1%)

Top 10 national programs:

  1. Nine News — 1.814 million
  2. Seven News  1.745 million
  3. Sunday Night (Seven)  1.654 million
  4. 60 Minutes (Nine)  1.609 million
  5. The Block (Nine)  1.404 million
  6. Grand Designs (ABC)  1.334 million
  7. Dancing With The Stars (Seven)  1.328 million
  8. ABC News  1.209 million
  9. Vera (ABC)  994,000
  10. Inside The Klu Klux Klan (Nine)  807,000

Top metro programs:

  1. Nine News — 1.284 million
  2. Seven News  1.178 million
  3. 60 Minutes (Nine)  1.137 million
  4. The Block (Nine)  1.074 million
  5. Sunday Night (Seven)  1.049 million

Losers: Anyone who missed either 60 Minutes or Sunday Night, anyone who watched The Block — same old, same old there.Metro news and current affairs:

  1. Nine News — 1.284 million
  2. Seven News  1.178 million
  3. 60 Minutes (Nine)  1.137 million
  4. Sunday Night (Seven)  1.049 million
  5. ABC News   808,000
  6. Ten Eyewitness News  337,000
  7. SBS World News  166,000

Morning TV:

  1. Insiders (ABC), 255,000, 80,000 on News 24)  325,000
  2. Weekend Today (Nine)  301,000
  3. Weekend Sunrise (Seven) — 298,000
  4. Landline (ABC)  224,000
  5. Offsiders (ABC)  186,000
  6. The Bolt Report (Ten)  159,000

Top pay TV channels:

  1. Fox  Sports 1  (3.7%)
  2. Fox Footy (2.5%)
  3. Foxtel Movies Premiere (2.1%)
  4. Fox Sports 3, UKTV. Fox Sports 5  (2.0%)

Top five pay TV programs:

  1. NRL: Canterbury v Auckland (Fox Sports 1) — 194,000
  2. NRL: Parramatta v Canberra  (Fox Sports 1) — 170,000
  3. AFL: Collingwood v Essendon (Fox Footy)  166,000
  4. F1: Italian Grand Prix (Fox Sports 5)  126,000
  5. AFL: Melbourne v GWS (Fox Sports 3) — 93,000

*Data © OzTAM Pty Limited 2015. The data may not be reproduced, published or communicated (electronically or in hard copy) in whole or in part, without the prior written consent of OzTAM. (All shares on the basis of combined overnight 6pm to midnight all people.) and network reports.

Peter Fray

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