As any Australian moved to unlawfully download Game of Thrones will attest, Rupert Murdoch has a sluggish approach to fast new tech. Just as he cleaves to an antique distribution engine, with a little help from local News Corp attendant George Brandis, he lacks the modern knack in his use of social platforms. Murdoch's tweets, lately in discussion for personnel recommendations to the Prime Minister, have long provided laughs to any soul more fluent in the cant of online branding than the guy who manages the Islamic State YouTube channel. K.R. Murdoch’s personal use of the social internet is both brutal and crude. Certainly, the Murdoch thumb seems as unskilled in the operation of its iPad as the Murdoch Empire is with the needs of iPad users. It is, perhaps, his ignorant aversion to 21st-century media that produces empty or bizarre dispatches. Although Gawker posits that liquor might be behind curious declarations like “all Egyptians are white”, there is possibly another and more scholarly influence at play in the papal knight’s short works: maybe the guy loves poetry. Over time, Murdoch’s tweets have evinced a style too dependable to be the byproduct of poor tablet literacy alone.  His free verbal repetition -- “Believe Gawker, believe any nonsense” -- and fondness for the hard return have begun to reveal a despot with a modernist's heart. Part telegram, part Old Testament raging, the patriarch's works may owe more to T.S. Eliot than they do to hard grog. As literary and theatre critic Cam Woodhead has it, the spare experimentation of Gertrude Stein can be seen online in the Murdoch lab. “His go-to word on Twitter is the adverb 'just' (no one would accuse him of overusing the adjective, or even knowing what it means). And if you ignore the massive ego and patriarchal sentiments, you can sense shades of Stein in the phrasing,” said Woodhead. And he asks us to compare a line from the great modernist’s study in banality Tender Buttons ...
A line distinguishes it. A line just distinguishes it
with one of his early fragments ...