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Dec 15, 2014

Telstra wins, we all lose in NBN deal

We'll get the broadband network we can afford -- and unfortunately, we can't afford much.

Paddy Manning

Crikey business editor

25 comments

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25 thoughts on “Telstra wins, we all lose in NBN deal

  1. Luke Hellboy

    This government obviously knows the value of nothing. If only they at least knew the cost of anything.

  2. drsmithy

    There was a familiar divide yesterday between the savage reaction of technology specialists — many of whom are understandably fibre zealots and see the NBN as essential infrastructure to future-proof Australia — and the mainstream media, who see the NBN as a project like any other, with costs and benefits to be weighed responsibly.

    This particular false dichotomy fallacy pretty much defines the whole NBN “debate”.

  3. Graeski

    That even Crikey can describe those technical experts who favour the original architecture of the NBN as “fibre zealots” speaks volumes about the IT profession’s total failure in getting its message across throughout the whole sorry national broadband debate over the last few years.

    Let me suggest an analogy. Let’s say the new Andrews government in Victoria decided to go ahead with the East-West link in a new form: in order to save a few billion dollars, the new freeway would consist of only a single lane in either direction and, where possible, it would be re-routed over existing suburban roadways in order to save money. Leaving aside the fact that they would be breaking an election promise, would they not also be howled down as proposing the ridiculous? And if anyone pointed out that a single-lane freeway was a ludicrous concept, would they be described as “zealots”?

    Liberal party supporters may be congratulating themselves that the issue is done and dusted and that they’ve “won” – but it ain’t over, folks. The current plan is a band-aid at best. The underlying wound still exists.

  4. zut alors

    ‘…whether Australia was suddenly “so rich that we can blast away billions of dollars without worrying about the cost?” ‘

    Good old Malcolm. He could also put that question regarding the controversial Joint Strike Fighters deal (value $24 Billion) or the unknown & never mentioned cost of fighting interminable unwinnable wars in which we have no interest nor any business.

    The Rudd/Gillard NBN was to be sold off eventually therefore those ‘blast(ed) away billions’ would have been recouped. Turnbull is smarter than this but he’s sold his soul, ho hum…

  5. paddy

    [There was a familiar divide yesterday between the savage reaction of technology specialists — many of whom are understandably fibre zealots and see the NBN as essential infrastructure to future-proof Australia ]
    Sheesh Paddy, I expected better of you.
    Then again, when even Adele Ferguson writes an utterly lame puff piece in the AFR [Here http://tinyurl.com/nyjkhtp ]lauding the brilliance of Malcolm Turnbull. While completely missing the point of what a turkey we’ve all been sold… I guess I shouldn’t be surprised by much at all any more.
    But I would have hoped Crikey could do better.
    BTW That link to the Kohler piece in Business Spectator is paywalled. Grrrr!

  6. 20/20

    No one should now be suprised that the NBN has been changed to “Mal’s model”

    On first principles, Liberals never fund large massive projects. Because XX billion dollar projects, are in Liberal eyes, potentially XX billion dollar, political nightmares waiting to happen, if things go wrong

    Secondly, Malcolm is an investment banker – who years ago when the tech bubble was starting to roar along in the US, decided to get into Ozemail in Australia. His actual understanding of the technology is limited to what he needs to know from an investment standpoint only

    I agree with Graeski- IT professionals, could have done more on talking up what the NBN could mean to all Australians.

  7. Gratton Wilson

    That Australia sold its vital communications capability into private hands that has profit as its sole agenda demonstrates the shortsightedness of the Howard Government.

  8. Dogs breakfast

    It’s not just technology specialists/zealots, it’s anyone who has looked at this with a clear head and functioning synapses.

    The promise to build roads at similar expenses never receives the sort of cost/benefit analysis that the NBN has had to endure, and the benefits are multitude, with virtually unimaginable yet to be invented uses if the NBN went through as planned.

    This is so dumb. If the MSM think this is just another project then they are dumb as well. Sure, in the most facile analysis it is, but of all the fruit on the tree, this is the lowest hanging, richest, juiciest, ripest fruit of all, by such a long way, it’s hardly even on the same tree.

    More roads inevitably leads to more traffic. That has been proven time and again.

    More NBN could, among other things, lead to less traffic, which means we wouldn’t need more roads.

    But that is just one tiny benefit of the NBN.

    This is an investment like no other that we could make. Only renewable energy comes close in terms of being worth government assistance.

    Oops!

  9. John64

    Kevin bloody Rudd had one thing to do…

    Just one thing.

    Get that NBN in… but no…

  10. drsmithy

    That Australia sold its vital communications capability into private hands that has profit as its sole agenda demonstrates the shortsightedness of the Howard Government.

    I doubt it was considered shortsighted from the perspective of the people who benefited from it.

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