Shaun Micallef’s Mad As Hell on ABC at 8 pm is the only TV program which explains the current bout of madness and right wing Looney Tunes atmosphere we in Team Australia find ourselves mired in. Host Shaun Micallef should be up for a Gold Logie and a Gold Walkley. (The program’s depiction of Bill Shorten is terrifyingly accurate). The very first scene of last night’s program captured our present level of debate very well (police characters directing women in burqas to the glass box, a person in a KKK outfit to the front row of the audience). Mad As Hell had 903,000 national/ 623,000 metro/ 280,000 regional viewers. Arrest the lot and put them in cells, said the Attorney General and his claque of media police brandishing the plastic sword featured in the Daily Telegraph. Mad As Hell, Micallef and the programs’ producers  (which includes ITV) is one of two programs game enough, through satire, to take the piss on the current hysteria (the other is The Roast on ABC2 at 7.30pm and a likely candidate for the Malcolm Turnbull cost cutting axe). Where are the others? Are there any others?

The most watched program last was The Block Glasshouse with 1.936 million national/ 1.319 million metro/ 617,000 regional viewers. Nine won the night in metro main channels. Seven had a tiny win in Total People in the metros. In the regions though Seven won overall and the main channels by solid margins. Only The Block did well for Nine.

Morning TV seems to have settled down after the usual disruption from the start of Daylight Saving last Sunday. Pity it has not done anything for Today on Nine which continues to languish under 300,000 metro viewers — 280,000 yesterday wasn’t good enough. Sunrise’s audience of 361,000 was for Seven. No such luck at 6pm for Seven News though. Daylight Saving has cut viewing numbers in the early evening for all networks (as it does every year). Seven News has narrowed the gap, but Nine News remains in front in Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane (Seven won the five metros because of big margins in Adelaide and Perth.

Network channel share:

  1. Seven (31.7%)
  2. Nine (30.2%)
  3. ABC (16.7%)
  4. Ten (16.5%)
  5. SBS (4.9%)

Network main channels:

  1. Nine (22.1%)
  2. Seven (20.9%)
  3. ABC (11.4%)
  4. Ten (10.1%)
  5. SBS ONE (3.9%)

Top 5 digital channels: 

  1. 7TWO (6.8%)
  2. GO (5.2%)
  3. 7mate (4.0%)
  4. ABC2 (3.4%)
  5. ONE (3.3%)

Top 10 national programs:

  1. The Block Glasshouse (Nine) — 1.936 million
  2. The Force (Seven) — 1.507 million
  3. Border Security (Seven) — 1.412 million
  4. Nine News — 1.390 million
  5. Home and Away (Seven) – 1.379 million
  6. Seven News — 1.245 million
  7. Criminal Minds (Seven) — 1.241 million
  8. ABC News — 1.105 million
  9. 7.30 (ABC) — 995,000
  10. A Current Affair (Nine) — 971,000

Losers: Anyone who didn’t watch Mad As Hell.Metro news and current affairs:

  1. Seven News 984,000
  2. Seven News/ Today Tonight — 984,000
  3. Nine News — 948,000
  4. Nine News 6.30 — 925,000
  5. A Current Affair (Nine) – 816,000
  6. ABC News  –  762,000
  7. 7.30 (ABC) — 672,000
  8. The Project 7pm (Ten) — 571,000
  9. Ten Eyewitness News — 560,000
  10. The Project 6.30pm (Ten) — 467,000

Morning TV:

  1. Sunrise (Seven) – 361,000
  2. Today (Nine) – 280,000
  3. The Morning Show (Seven) — 161,000
  4. News Breakfast (ABC,  65,000 + 54,000 on News 24) — 119,000
  5. Mornings (Nine) — 99,000
  6. Studio 1o (Ten) — 44,000

Top five pay TV channels:

  1. LifeStyle  (3.1%)
  2. Fox 8  (2.3%)
  3. TVHITS! (2.2%)
  4. Discovery (1.7%)
  5. UKTV (1.7%)

Top five pay TV programs:

  1. Paddock To Plate (LifeStyle) — 85,000
  2. NCIS (TVHITS!) — 78,000
  3. Grand Designs (LifeStyle) — 60,000
  4. Family Guy (Fox8) — 59,000
  5. Coronation Street (UKTV) — 58,000

*Data © OzTAM Pty Limited 2013. The data may not be reproduced, published or communicated (electronically or in hard copy) in whole or in part, without the prior written consent of OzTAM. (All shares on the basis of combined overnight 6pm to midnight all people.) and network reports.

Peter Fray

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