Environment

Sep 25, 2013

Why sacking the Climate Commission might help it

The born-again Climate Council seems to be a goer financially. And being axed by the Abbott government could help it do its job.

Cathy Alexander — Freelance journalist and PhD candidate in politics at the University of Melbourne

Cathy Alexander

Freelance journalist and PhD candidate in politics at the University of Melbourne

Getting the sack could prove a blessing in disguise for the Climate Commission, which might operate more effectively now it is out of the government’s tent.

46 comments

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46 thoughts on “Why sacking the Climate Commission might help it

  1. Electric Lardyland

    The Abbott government’s record on climate change so far. Well, they’ve taken ‘direct action’, against people who believe that climate change is a problem that we urgently need to act on.

  2. Daemon

    I don’t suppose one minute that I will be the first person to point out that an organisation, completely funded by government, it can raise 9300 new members in 33 hours and raise a war chest in excess of $430,000 is probably something that the government should be very aware of in terms of what people are actually interested in and care about.

    This may not be entirely the way it seems to the pundits, but as long as organisations like Getup can muster 250,000 signatures on a petition to change the government’s view about one of their policies, starting the day after the election, perhaps this government is going to be put the position where it actually has to listen, just broke change.

    There has been much set in the mainstream media (FWIW), about movements being pushed by the population, most of which is written off by the deeply intelligent likes of Christopher Pyne and George Pell’s protégé, the Prime Minister, which essentially was to write these things off as a passing fancy. One should perhaps also look at the electorate of Indi, and how much change was wrought in that particular space by local people fed up with the lack of attention by their local member.

    There is probably a space in Australian politics for a voice for every electorate, as set up and so well run by “avoice4indi” who with very little problem unseated a long-time Liberal member, who then of course became responsible for the George Pell protégé to only have one woman in the Cabinet.

  3. Scott

    Surely the environmental thinktank/NGO sector is well populated already in Australia without this new Climate Council
    We have the Australian Institute, the Climate Institute, even the grand daddy of them all, the IPCC. And they all say the same thing…the sky is falling, reduce carbon emissions.
    I think we can do without Will Steffen and Tim Flannery saying the same thing. Just more noise..

  4. Daemon

    Apologies for the errors above.

    I don’t suppose for one minute that I will be the first person to point out that an organisation, completely unfunded by government, which can raise 9300 new members in 33 hours and raise a war chest in excess of $430,000 is probably something that the government should be very aware of in terms of what people are actually interested in and care about.

    This may not be entirely the way it seems to the pundits, but as long as organisations like Getup can muster 250,000 signatures on a petition to change the government’s view about one of their policies, starting the day after the election, perhaps this government is going to be put in the position where it actually has to listen, not just talk about change.

    There has been much said in the mainstream media (FWIW), about movements being pushed by the population, most of which is written off by the deeply intelligent likes of Christopher Pyne and George Pell’s protégé, the Prime Minister, which essentially is to write these things off as a passing fancy.

    One should perhaps also look at the electorate of Indi, and how much change was wrought in that particular space by local people fed up with the lack of attention by their local member.

    There is probably a space in Australian politics for a voice for every electorate, as set up and so well run by “avoice4indi” who with very little problem unseated a long-time Liberal member, and then of course became responsible for the George Pell protégé to only have one woman in the Cabinet.

  5. Jimmy

    Scott – While I agree that we alsready have enough bodies to tell us something that everyone by now should treat as fact, the position we now find ourselves in, with a govt wanting to repeal the legislation for what is widely considered the best method in tackling climate change and replacing it with one that everyone credible source states can not achieve the 5% reduction target that has been set for it and is incredibly expensive to increase that target beyond 5% indicates that we do need a body that can take all the “noise” form various sources and fashion it into a message that is easily digestible.
    Despite the change of govt and Mr blot’s prognostications cliamte change is real, we are causign and we do need to address it – whatever get’s that message through is worthwhile.

  6. David Hand

    I’ve no problem with the druids having a privately funded set up. If enough people think their view merits publicity and are willing to back that with donations then good on them.

  7. Suzanne Blake

    The Flannery group were a drain on taxpayers, he was on $185,000 a year for 3 days work and all his predictions were wrong, well 95% of them

  8. Josi V

    You are not alone with those thoughts Daemon. There is a lot of room in the political landscape for people-power and politicians who do not take this possibility seriously will never see beyond their own livelihood (i.e. they do not represent the electorate that voted them in).

    Not many people stop to think just how much power we hold – preferring only to say it is all to hard and to leave it up to someone else (politicians), when in fact many politicians don’t really know what they are doing.

  9. Gratton Wilson

    Australian voters elect politicians to achieve solutions to problems that are too big for them, as individuals or small groups, to solve. That is what politicians are paid to do. That is why we pay taxes. The Climate Commission was created to examine reliable information about the various aspects of climate change and to make it available in a coherent form. Why has it been axed? The only apparent reason seems to be is that the Abbott government does not want information about climate change to be available to his government nor to the public at large. This has a smell of burning libraries about it.

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