United States

Nov 7, 2012

Congress: more gridlock on the cards, House and Senate split

Will it President Obama be plagued by the same legislative gridlock that has characterised the last two years, or willhe find himself with a more co-operative Congress?

Charles Richardson — Editor of The World is not Enough

Charles Richardson

Editor of The World is not Enough

Well, he’s back. Now that the big question of the day has been answered, it’s time to think about whether Barack Obama’s second term is likely to be any more harmonious than his first. Will it be plagued by the same legislative gridlock that has characterised the last two years, or will the President find himself with a more co-operative Congress?

Like our federal Parliament (which was modelled after it), the US Congress consists of a House of Representatives based on population and a Senate based on equal representation of states. At the 2010 mid-term elections the Republicans won a solid majority in the House but failed to take control of the Senate. Although today’s results are still incomplete, we already know that this state of affairs is going to continue.

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One thought on “Congress: more gridlock on the cards, House and Senate split

  1. Charles Richardson

    In later Senate counting, the Democrats have indeed scored an upset by retaining Montana, the Republicans are hanging on narrowly in Nevada, and most surprisingly the Democrats have maintained their wafer-thin lead in North Dakota. So it’s looking like 55-45, but could still be one either side of that.

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