Bad blood sees Labor well-placed to win the ACT

The ACT has voted and political types are biting their nails as counting continues -- but a Labor-Green government is the most likely outcome, due to fractious relations between Greens and Liberals.

Cathy Alexander — Freelance journalist and PhD candidate in politics at the University of Melbourne

Cathy Alexander

Freelance journalist and PhD candidate in politics at the University of Melbourne

The make-up of the ACT Legislative Assembly is hanging in the balance following Saturday’s poll — but bad blood between the territory’s Liberals and Greens has insiders strongly tipping Labor will retain government, however the final count falls.

Nervous staffers in the Assembly are refreshing their “Elections ACT” websites hourly to see what the notoriously unpredictable Hare-Clark multi-member voting system throws up. Results should be clear on Saturday.

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4 comments

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4 thoughts on “Bad blood sees Labor well-placed to win the ACT

  1. Sam

    How lovely to see the Liberals once again come up with new metrics to determine who had the moral right to form government. I also like Seselja’s idea that any party that falls one seat short of a majority is nonethtless entitled to form government.

  2. Norman Hanscombe

    Hare Clarke is a problem only to those who aren’t able to understand P.R. A young mainlander who came to Tassie in 1976 was teaching people how it worked within weeks of his arrival. Even Labor’s ‘experts’ have long had difficulty understanding the workings of any proportional voting system.
    In 1971, for example, despite months of warnings from a non-important ALP member that their new system didn’t work, NSW State Secretary Peter Westerway (one time Senior Lecturer in Government at Sydney Uni and Television Current Affairs personality) took a flawed P.R. system to Conference. No one understood its flawed nature until they happened to recount a ballot and found they kept getting different results with each recount. At that point they belatedly admitted there was a problem, and sought outside help.
    In 1974 an equally unimportant Victorian branch member explained a loophole in the Senate voting system with Double Dissolutions which he’d noticed as a schoolboy in 1951, merely from reading newspaper election result reports carefully. The two senior ALP “experts” dismissed it out of hand. Only later did the Federal Leadership acknowledge the loophole existed.
    Most amusing of all was the fiasco at a NSW State ALP Conference (in 1986 from memory) when the “experts” tried to do what Tasmanians had done successfully for years and gain the maximum representation for their faction in a ballot for the State Upper House seats. The “experts” managed only to almost cause the elimination of their main candidate which possibly shows that numbers men aren’t necessarily numerate?

  3. Malcolm Street

    The Greens would be mad to go into bed with the Liberals. Consider the Liberal Democrats in the UK – they were voted in mostly by people who wanted a Left alternative to Labour and then went and installed a Tory government. They’re facing annihilation. The Democrats and GST is another example.

    If Zed wanted to entertain governing with Green support, he could have tried courting them during the campaign. But no, the Liberals think they are Born to Rule (TM)

  4. izatso?

    that UK LibDem betrayal and treachery should be highlighted again, again and again for the damage and devolution done to progress and basic expectations of natural rights. Abbott was getting instruction from his colleagues when he was there 6 months ago and Bernardi is getting updates there now.

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