Federal

Jul 16, 2012

Come in Spinner: out of caves our opinions come

Evolutionary psychology often seems like a "just so" story and it has the unfortunate quality of not being, unless we discover time travel, falsifiable. But it does have some very useful insights into how we think and act today.

Noel Turnbull

Adjunct professor of media and communications at RMIT University.

Evolutionary psychology often seems like a “just so” story and it has the unfortunate quality of not being, unless we discover time travel, falsifiable. But it does have some very useful insights into how we think and act today.

1 comments

Leave a comment

One thought on “Come in Spinner: out of caves our opinions come

  1. Scott Grant

    Here we go again. It is simply wrong to conflate “anti-immigrant” and “anti-refugee” with “anti-immigration”. Certainly, politicians, from John Howard onwards have played on the fear of the other for political gain, while at the same time, expanding our immigration intake dramatically.

    It is possible to be anti-immigration without being anti-immigrant or anti-refugee. It worries me that the distinction is not made. And that, therefore, this otherwise reasonable article is covertly contributing to the prejudice and bigotry of those who will not countenance any discussion of population policy on the grounds that to do so is racist.

    I don’t know the figures, but according to Sustainable Population Australia, it is possible to increase our refugee intake, while simultaneously aiming for a stable, sustainable population. We just need to have a genuine population target and to calibrate our overall immigration levels to achieve it.

Share this article with a friend

Just fill out the fields below and we'll send your friend a link to this article along with a message from you.

Your details

Your friend's details

Sending...