Media

May 14, 2012

Oz’s Twitter backflip … Smith v Salter food feud … Leveson latest …

Age journalist Denise Ryan has two interesting stories in today's paper about issues affecting Melbourne's African-Australian communities. Except a quick look at them could make a reader confused ... Plus other media news.

So maybe Twitter isn't the devil. Media writer Simon Canning writes in today's Australian about a new system which will stronger integrate social media into News Limited news stories:
"News Limited is seeking a new publishing platform that will feed relevant tweets and other social media updates directly to journalists as they draft stories, just like a wire service. The decision to pursue the social media project, which will pipe Twitter and Facebook streams to computer screens as journalists write stories, will form part of the company's $60 million editorial computer system upgrade. News has decided all mastheads will adopt the Methode publishing system, which will publish copy in print and also online. ...News desks have increasingly come to view social media as an important source of breaking news information and public, corporate and political reaction."
What a contrast from The Oz's editorial back on April 30, 2009 titled 'Time is up for Twitter':
"Like swine influenza, technologies such as Twitter race around the world before spluttering out. And when they do, the news is reported via a technology that is robust and portable, one that is information rich and never crashes -- the platform for the online information age you are reading now. And the story it tells about the latest online fad is always the same. Like diseases that must mutate to infect ever more hosts, transitory technologies have an enormous impact until people build up resistance - which is what is happening to free social messaging service Twitter now. Certainly Twitter has generated a pandemic of popularity, but it appears many people quickly decide Twitter is tedious, with 60 per cent of new users becoming ex-users in a month. Anybody who has used it knows why. Twitters in the information industry -- journalists, political staffers, publicly funded issues activists -- think Twitter is terrific because it allows them to all but instantaneously agree with each other on the issues of the hour. But in their enthusiasm, they confuse the medium for the message. Twitter's 140-character message format is a content-killer, leaving most tweets with the compelling content of those "I'm on the bus" mobile phone conversations impossible to avoid on public transport."
Same people, different story. Age journalist Denise Ryan has two interesting stories in today's paper about issues affecting Melbourne's African-Australian communities. Except a quick look at them could make a reader confused ... From page six:

From page 13:

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1 comments

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One thought on “Oz’s Twitter backflip … Smith v Salter food feud … Leveson latest …

  1. Pierre

    Another high point in The Australian’s love affair with Twitter (from the print edition, Oct 27th, 2010). They deleted the first part of it online.

    “TWITTER has become the dunny-door graffiti of the digital age, adding precisely nothing to the sum of human knowledge.

    So why is it that the ABC has opted to include it in the broadcaster’s serious current affairs offerings? This week, as always, unattributed commentary scrolled across our screens as John Howard answered audience questions on Q & A. Supporters see it as democracy in action, but the ABC would be better off leaving viewers with a blank space than dignifiying this gratuitous feedback.”

    http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/opinion/a-twitter-idea-for-qa/story-e6frg71x-1225943900482

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