How good are Sundays? The Sunday Telegraph just launched a new ad campaign. It’s got all the classic Aussie Sunday cliches, from eating fat-filled brunches, to “it’s trackie daks and morning hair ’til noon” and blokes doing walks of shame down the street.  We’re split on whether it’s lame or not … what do you think?

Um, not that sort of food story. A Crikey reader sent us in this delightful story and its related content  from Adelaide Now. “Not Earth shattering, but a combination of Google technology and Murdoch press sensitivity? Check out the “Related Content” part of the page”, said the eagle eyed reader …

Snag in a test tube. Delightful little image on the front of The Sydney Morning Herald website at the moment. Not sure if that’s exactly the kind of synthetic food scientists are creating …

Dodgy customer service no more

“The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) makes the demand in the final report of its inquiry into the customer service and complaints-handling practices of domestic phone providers.” — SBS

Michael Smith silenced

“Broadcaster Michael Smith must make an undertaking not to broadcast material from an interview with Bob Kernohan, former president of the Australian Workers Union, before he returns to air on Sydney’s 2UE.” — The Australian

NATO-led forces kill BBC journo

“The Nato-led International Security Assistance Force (Isaf) in Afghanistan has admitted it mistakenly killed BBC reporter Ahmed Omed Khpulwak in July.” BBC

A new media future?

“Two of America’s largest newspaper chains, Journal Register (JRC) and MediaNews Group, have agreed to a merger that isn’t a merger.”Greenslade blog, The Guardian

Crude stick-figure s-x ad gets banned

“Ad hominem adultery harassment site Cheaterville.com is incensed. They wanted to run the above advertisement in the Toronto Sun during the Toronto Film Festival, but the Sun rejected them.” Gawker

Peter Fray

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