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Jul 1, 2011

Parkinson: low-carbon economy not as hard as it looks

Our hung parliament presented, for the first time in living memory, an opportunity to deal with the substantive policy issues ignored in the campaign, writes Giles Parkinson of Climate Spectator.

A few days after last year’s federal election, I welcomed the prospect that a hung parliament presented, for the first time in living memory, an opportunity to deal with the substantive policy issues that had been ignored in the preceding campaign.

4 comments

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4 thoughts on “Parkinson: low-carbon economy not as hard as it looks

  1. Frank Campbell

    “without a carbon price, investment in the tens of billions of baseload energy that is required had stalled.”
    And with a ‘carbon price’, baseload powergen will still use fossil fuels.

    This piece conflates gains made through energy efficiency (which is happening anyway) with the dead elephant in the room: renewables. At the current state of technology, these are a dead weight on the economy. Governments are waking up. Solar parasitism is being rolled back. Wind is seen for the fraud it is. Flannery’s hype of hot rocks is dead in the water (see analysts’ reports on his company Geodynamics, spending $100 million of public money in the Cooper basin). The Severn Tidal barrage ($80 billion) abandoned because it was “unproven” and environmenally disastrous for the Severn wetlands.

    Britain has been deindustrialising for decades. That just might be relevant to falling CO2 emissions. The same applies to most of Western Europe.

    Politically, Parkinson is similarly obtuse: “The electorate, I suggested, had chosen well by not choosing at all.”

    Hello? Here we are, ready to humanely stun the ALP before the slaughter. Gillard was forced to a carbon tax by the Greens (she didn’t “lie”). The carbon tax is ridiculous policy: it cannot affect climate, is unilateral, hypocritical (massive expansion of FF exports), will eventually damage manufacturing and mining as it increases, and will lead to failed technologies like wind expanding further.

    The kindest thing one can say about the carbon tax is that it is premature: there can be no “transition” to “clean green renewables” until they exist- i.e. when they are both technologically and economically feasible.

    As for the Greens, my party, they have reached their high water mark. From now on they will be blamed (rightly) for foisting this mess upon us and for criminal neglect of the real environment.

  2. Harvey Tarvydas

    Dr Harvey M Tarvydas

    Excellent article Giles Parkinson.
    A dose of authentic reason presented with sophisticated international wisdom devoid of that discussing intellectual ‘Aussie sauce’ of frothing bitter lunacy of Rhodes Scholarship status.

  3. Harvey Tarvydas

    Dr Harvey M Tarvydas

    UNFORTUNATE IMPORTANT ERROR — SINCERE APPOLOGIES
    Excellent article Giles Parkinson.
    A dose of authentic reason presented with sophisticated international wisdom devoid of that DISGUSTING intellectual ‘Aussie sauce’ of frothing bitter lunacy of Rhodes Scholarship status.

  4. AR

    I look forward to watching the MM’s contortions & contradictions when the carbon price is set and he tries to claim it will devastate whichever enterprise he is visiting for the day’s photo-opt wearing funny hat/costume. The only problem is that the potential replacements gurning behind him might blow a gasket or brain vein trying to control themselves.

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