How Twitter trends are measured

“Since Twitter first introduced the Trends feature in the summer of 2008, one frequently asked question has been ‘Why isn’t X trending?’ This question has come up around a variety of subjects, from #justinbieber and #adamlambert to #flotilla, #iranelection and #demo2010. This week, people are wondering about WikiLeaks, with some asking if Twitter has blocked #wikileaks, #cablegate or other related topics from appearing in the list of top Trends. The answer: Absolutely not.” — Twitter blog

Anonymous fights for WikiLeaks

“For those unfamiliar with the depths of internet sub-culture, “Anonymous” is a hard concept to understand. Simply put they are an anonymous crowdsourced set of vigilantes responsible for pulling off some of the most newsworthy stunts in internet history. But past projects like punking Scientology of flooding YouTube with p-rn fail in comparison to their recent attempts to disrupt the established entities who they deem to have aligned with the wrong side of justice over the WikiLeaks story. Now, in eerie and awesome fashion, a new video has been posted that describes their agenda in the most historic terms.” — MediaBistro

Are foreign correspondents dead?

“As for today’s slimmed-down, age-of-austerity foreign bureau, with a single, multitasking correspondent dashing around like a mad hatter, desperately trying to meet multiple deadlines every day for online, print, video, audio, tweet and blog: the trouble here is the poor journalist has very little time to research any story in depth, let alone to stop and think. It’s no accident that some of the best foreign corresponding we have today is in magazines like the New Yorker, written by journalists who have months to pull together a single long report.” — The Guardian

Assange’s admiring hackers pledge revenge

“In a campaign that had some declaring the start of a ‘cyberwar’, hundreds of internet activists mounted retaliatory attacks on the websites of multinational companies and other organisations they deemed hostile to the WikiLeaks antisecrecy organisation and its jailed founder, Julian Assange.”The New York Times

There’s just no stopping Facebook

“Facebook has broken through the 10 million barrier of active users in Australia, confirming the country’s status as one of the company’s most important markets.” — The Sydney Morning Herald

Meanjin deputy editor interviews departing editor

“Spikers — tis the season for silliness and unseriousness. And, of course, with our wonderful editor Sophie Cunningham saying her goodbyes, it’s a time for sadness as well (and, as you’ll note from our post title, mixed metaphors).” — Spike the Meanjin blog

This year in telly

“In the second of two feature articles, Aussie TV critics pick their worst for the year: amongst the list are Cops LAC, The X Factor, Warnie, The Matty Johns Show. They also identify some of the key trends of the last 12 months. What will be 2010′s legacy to television?” — TV Tonight

A tale of a blogger getting shafted

“Earlier this week I received the following email inviting me to come down to the Jake Gyllenhaal & Anne Hathaway photocall for Moet & Chandon’s party at The Mint on Macquarie Street tonight celebrating the premiere of their Love & Other Drugs movie… ” — SassISam

Peter Fray

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