When Daniel Assange was 16, his father Julian asked him to be a part of WikiLeaks, the controversial group of internet freedom fighters that was then in its infancy. Sceptical of the project’s likelihood of success, and not on the best of terms with his father, Daniel said no.

"I never thought he was going to succeed," the younger Assange says, four-and-a-half years later. "It was a ridiculous concept, that he was going to actually leak government documents to the entire world."