Victoria

Aug 7, 2009

The University of Melbourne gags VCA staff

The University of Melbourne has placed an unprecedented gag on Victorian College of the Arts staff members talking to the media, with Senior staff members currently locked in a battle with the University over reforms stemming from the introduction of the controversial Melbourne Model.

Andrew Crook — Former <em>Crikey</em> Senior Journalist

Andrew Crook

Former Crikey Senior Journalist

The University of Melbourne has placed an unprecedented gag on Victorian College of the Arts staff members talking to the media, in contravention of the University's own academic freedom rules. In an email obtained by Crikey, VCAM Dean Sharman Pretty told senior staff member Martin Croft, the resident director of hit musical Jersey Boys and the now-cancelled Music Theatre program, that talking to journalists over the changes at VCAM would be "unwise". "As a member of the staff of the University of Melbourne, it is expected that you will comply with the University's request of all staff, that interface with media is managed by the communications experts who draw on the sources that they believe appropriate to address any particular issue at a given time", the email says. "The University has the right to form its position on various issues and to communicate its messages in a coherent and consistent manner by staff of its choice." Senior staff members are currently locked in a battle with the University over reforms to the course stemming from the introduction of the controversial Melbourne Model. Pretty tells Croft that staff members are free to speak as individuals, but doubts their ability to handle requests from journalists: "It is quite a difficult thing to manage when pressed by journalist and other interested parties. I suspect Mark's [Pollard, Head of Composition at VCAM] advice to you was therefore a short-hand version of suggesting that to interface with the press would be unwise." However, the University's guidelines on academic freedom in its collective agreement appear to fly in the face of Pretty's missive:
Intellectual freedom means the freedom of academic staff ... to engage in critical inquiry, intellectual discourse and public controversy without fear or favour.

Croft, defying his superior, told Crikey that VCAM staff were running scared:

"Professor Pretty has a history of agressive tactics, and it has got to the situation where staff feel like they can't express themselves over the issue."

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2 comments

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2 thoughts on “The University of Melbourne gags VCA staff

  1. Rena Zurawel

    I have never heard about a ‘successful merger’ in Australia, as yet. . Anyway, it does not really matter since the Australian universities, albeit very expensive, are not world famous for their performance.
    They also lack the tradition and a traditional concept of the ‘universitas’. (common and fee-free).
    Thus, it does affect the contents of the curriculum and traditionally ‘independent’ status of a university. And, as long as our tertiary education existence is dependent upon money from i.e. overseas students – as far as I am concerned- our university education is mainly a commercial establishment, never mind the academic contents and discipline.
    Or: Lucri bonus est odor ex re qualibet ? (Juvenal xiv.204) – the smell of the money is good whenever it comes from.

    Is it the smell of the money we are talking about discussing academic standards and freedom of our universities?

  2. Gavin Moodie

    This article conflates the Victorian College of Arts’ inability to operate within its revenue which led to its full merger – takeover, really – by the University of Melbourne and the curriculum changes introduced by the ‘Melbourne model’.

    The University of Melbourne’s earlier merger with (again, takeover of) the former Melbourne College of Advanced Education was reasonably successful, as was the University of Wollongong’s takeover of the Wollongong Institute of Education, James Cook University’s takeover of the Townsville College of Advanced Education, the University of Tasmania’s takeover of the Tasmanian State Institute of Technology, the University of Queensland’s takeover of the Queensland Agricultural College . . . .

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