The Winners: Underbelly was tops with 2.465 million people. Seven News was next with 1.648 million and Customs on Nine at 8pm was next with 1.449 million. Today Tonight was 4th with 1.432 million and the fresh episode of Two and a Half Men at 7.30pm averaged 1.366 million people. Aussie Ladette To Lady debuted with 1.360 million after Underbelly, but the audience was sharply down from around 10pm onwards. Nine News was 7th with 1.211 million viewers, and the 7pm ABC News was next with 1.175 million. Home and Away averaged 1.157 million in 9th for Seven and A Current Affair was 10th with 1.149 million people. Nine’s 7pm repeat of Two and a Half Men averaged 1.090 million, Desperate Housewives on Seven at 8.30pm averaged 1.029 million and So You Think You Can Dance Australia averaged 1.024 million from 7.30pm to 8.30pm on Ten. 14th was the Ten News with 1.005 million. That’s its 4th million plus audience in the past ten days.

The Losers: Seven’s Brothers And Sisters, 969,000. Not bad, but a touch on the weak side. How I Met Your Mother at 7.30pm on Seven. It’s not strong enough. Why? 932,000 last night. Is Seven running dead on Monday nights while Underbelly is on? It finished 4th. (Top Gear was 5th, The 7.30 Report was 3rd). Good News Week on Ten at 8.30pm, 692,000. Will Ten hang in there while Underbelly is on air?

News & CA: Seven News again won nationally and in every market as did Today Tonight. Ten’s late News/Sports Tonight averaged 349,000. The 7.30 Report averaged 993,000. Four Corners, 852,000. Media Watch, 782,000. Lateline averaged 302,000, Lateline Business, 175,000. 6.30pm SBS News, 201,000, 176,000 for the 9.30pm edition. 7am Sunrise on Seven, 381,000, 7am Today on Nine, 263,000.

The Stats: Nine won 6pm to midnight All People (and everything else) with 34.2% (39.5%) with Seven on 24.9% (23.7%); Ten on 17.6% (18.7%), the ABC with 16.5% (13.8%) and SBS 6.8% (6.3%). Nine won all five metro markets and leads the week 33.1% to 26.5% for Seven. In regional areas, Nine won with WIN/NBN on 33.9% from Prime/7Qld with 23.0%, the ABC on 17.7%, Southern Cross (Ten) on 16.6% and SBS on 8.7%.

Glenn Dyer’s comments: Nine had another Underbelly moment last night as Seven, Ten, the ABC and SBS battled manfully to remind viewers that they were still there. Underbelly helped the appalling Australian version of Ladette To Lady to stay in the race, but the audience more than halved over the course of the hour from just after 9.30pm. Nine’s concocted Customs at 8pm features Vince Colosimo’s pieces to camera at either Sydney or Melbourne airports. (A sign saying Australian Federal Police in the last piece to camera last night was a bit of a give away).

Elsewhere, Nine’s News woes continue in Sydney. Third again behind Seven and the ABC. Nine has now confirmed that it can’t get a 5.30pm “soft news” program up in Sydney because they can’t find anyone to do it. Eddie McGuire and Lavinia Nixon will front the mooted Melbourne program, which will be similar to Brisbane Extra. Nine in Melbourne faces the prospect of giving up viewers because the Antiques Roadshow cheapie from the UK and cable rates well down there. There’s a chance the 5.30pm soft news program won’t go.

Unless Nine has something up its sleeve, it’s another year of running a distant second or third most nights in Sydney behind Seven and second nationally. It also doesn’t solve the problems at 6.30pm with A Current Affair. The 7.30 Report in Sydney had more viewers in that market last night than ACA.

TONIGHT: Seven’s with Animal Rescue, Find My Family, Packed To The Rafters and All Saints. Nine surprisingly has slotted the second episode of Aussie Ladette To Lady up against All Saints at 9.30pm after an adults only Two and a Half Men from 8.30pm to 9.30pm. Ten has a fresh NCIS at the same time and at 9.30pm has the not bad Lie To Me at 9.30pm.

Source: OzTAM, TV Networks reports

Peter Fray

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