The Hobart Mercury more behind the news than previously thought. It seems the paper’s website is two years, two months and 21 days behind the rest of the world. May Peter Brock rest in peace.

Australia: The land of employment. Apparently in the UK, when the going gets tough the tough get going — to Australia. This advertisement suggests the global financial crisis means something different to the Brits:

Which takes you here:

Outsourcing journalism to India. Maureen Dowd pointed out in the New York Times that much newspaper work may soon be outsourced to places like India. As an example, she shared the success of 53-year-old James Macpherson at the Pasadena Now. The concept has certainly started some discussion. But there are three reasons why I think it’s not a sustainable venture. — eat sleep publish

Redstone feeds fish as his empire implodes. Sumner Redstone, the media mogul who famously coined the phrase “content is king”, could well achieve another kind of fame very soon as the first major media casualty of the recession. His vast empire — which includes CBS, Viacom, the MTV networks, Paramount Pictures and DreamWorks — is crumbling. — Greenslade

Social media revolution. When it comes to social software, the real revolution has only just begun … The forces driving this revolution underlie the Crunchberry Project, the innovation class involving six Medill Master’s students (among them, two “programmer-journalists” funded by the Knight News Challenge). The class is developing a new Web site designed to encourage young adults to interact with each other around local news. — MediaShift Ideas Lab

Axl Rose vs Dr Pepper. GNR has filed a lawsuit demanding that Dr Pepper make good on its promise to give everyone in America a free soda now that Axl Rose has finished his masterpiece, 17 years in the making. — AdFreak

Free nationwide WiFi to the US? The FCC will vote on a plan this month that would bring free WiFi nationwide, according to a Reuters. Although strongly opposed by the cell phone industry, the plan calls to auction public airwaves with a mandate that the winning bidder set aside some for free Internet nationwide. — Marketing Pilgrim 

Peter Fray

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